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Old 06-28-2013, 03:15 PM   #61
 
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My mother is Afro-Caribbean (West Indian). She has noticeable African ancestry but probably more white ancestry than most AAs (esp. Scottish and British). My father is German/Russian and is an Ashkenazi Jew.

I'm sorry to hear about your problems w/your sense of identity. It's understandable considering how many people get confused about us and therefore send us confusing, conflicting messages about who we are.

I always knew what I was. The frustrating thing for me was (again) that so many other people were confused about me. When I lived north of where I am now, few people questioned my identity because I was very fair, had green eyes and other white features, straightened my hair and only spoke ebonics inside my house. They assumed I was white, or "whitish". My regret about that part of my life is there weren't enough black people around. My mom made it clear that was by her design (she has some positive qualities, but has a few issues too). So I had to go out of my way to make black friends.

When I moved closer to the Pacific and had a tan all year round and let my hair do it's thing LOL ... Suddenly it was a barrage of "'What are you?"s and people thinking I'm Greek, Spanish, Italian or Brazilian . Lots of folks, especially other Jews, knew I'm Jewish (Notice all the other groups are mixed with African ancestry.) When I try and go through security checkpoints at the airport, I am Arab. I was especially Arab just after 911 happened. I had to fly frequently then and every. single. time. coming. going. I got stopped, questioned and frisked. It was truly humiliating But equally baffling, when I've refused to fill out my "race" on business forms, they mark "white" I think those people are perhaps visually challenged, or maybe from the same crowd that thinks Slash or Vin Diesel or Malcolm Gladwell is just "white".

Anyway, the things that probably have helped me stay grounded in terms of identity: constantly learning about all of my heritages and keeping those groups of people in my life (but also others, too). I also find that engaging in cultural rituals helps too. But mostly, I just remind myself that I am more than the sum of my ethnic parts, just like everyone else is more than the sum of theirs. This unfathomable experience called life is full of incredible people from all ethnicities and walks of life. It's my loss if I close myself off to any of those groups of people.
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Old 06-28-2013, 03:38 PM   #62
 
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My mother is Afro-Caribbean (West Indian). She has noticeable African ancestry but probably more white ancestry than most AAs (esp. Scottish and British). My father is German/Russian and is an Ashkenazi Jew.

I'm sorry to hear about your problems w/your sense of identity. It's understandable considering how many people get confused about us and therefore send us confusing, conflicting messages about who we are.

I always knew what I was. The frustrating thing for me was (again) that so many other people were confused about me. When I lived north of where I am now, few people questioned my identity because I was very fair, had green eyes and other white features, straightened my hair and only spoke ebonics inside my house. They assumed I was white, or "whitish". My regret about that part of my life is there weren't enough black people around. My mom made it clear that was by her design. So I had to go out of my way to make black friends.

When I moved closer to the Pacific and had a tan all year round and let my hair do it's thing LOL ... Suddenly it was a barrage of "'What are you?"s and people thinking I'm Greek, Spanish, Italian or Brazilian . Lots of folks, especially other Jews, knew I'm Jewish (Notice all the other groups are mixed with African ancestry.) When I try and go through security checkpoints at the airport, I am Arab. I was especially Arab just after 911 happened. I had to fly frequently then and every. single. time. coming. going. I got stopped, questioned and frisked. It was truly humiliating But equally baffling, when I've refused to fill out my "race" on business forms, they mark "white" I think those people are perhaps visually challenged, or maybe from the same crowd that thinks Slash or Vin Diesel or Malcolm Gladwell is just "white".

Anyway, the things that probably have helped me stay grounded in terms of identity: constantly learning about all of my heritages and keeping those groups of people in my life (but also others, too). I also find that engaging in cultural rituals helps too. But mostly, I just remind myself that I am more than the sum of my ethnic parts, just like everyone else is more than the sum of theirs. This unfathomable experience called life is full of incredible people from all ethnicities and walks of life. It's my loss if I close myself off to any of those groups of people.
I love learning about other peoples backgrounds! That is so beautiful. Wow, my jaw dropped at the Arab/9.11 at the airport incidents. That is baffling and quite sad how our society is. When I fill out questions on race, I don't put anything (depends on my mood sometimes lol). It's also fascinating to see the change of how others perceived you when you moved. I mostly lived around a lot of other white individuals. Unfortunately, I have more 'white' friends than black. It seems too that when I would try to make black friends, they would automatically give me sneer looks or make fun of the way I spoke. I am not trying to generalize, I am just basing this off of own personal experience. I always try to make friends regardless of skin, but it sometimes nice to meet people who are similar bc they can understand the societal struggles, if you will. You sound very cultured though, and I think that is awesome! I love meeting people with numerous backgrounds, I find it so fascinating! I wish I could be more specific with my black side, but unfortunately all my grandfather would tell me was we are: "North African." Umm thanks? LOL
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Old 06-28-2013, 04:47 PM   #63
 
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Thanks for the compliment Samantha It's interesting you were told you are North African. Though I appreciate all cultures, admittedly I've had some unexplained, strong attraction to the culture (esp. the music and food), and people of North Africa in the past two years.

Like you, I don't know the exact location as it regards my African roots. I am hoping to find that out soon, since I'm about to re-take a ancestral DNA test (they couldn't determine the results from my first sample). I can't wait to find out ... Have you considered taking one of these tests?

As for your struggle with black people, not sure if this is true for you, but I found that some of that can be regional. I've found that people of ALL backgrounds in the US tend to be more rigid about their cultural/social expectations in areas that are more racially segregated (and generally more conservative). For example, I've found that coastal metropolitan communities tend to be far more tolerant of multi-cultural people. The times I've run into issues getting along w/some black people was when they lived in areas where they are segregated and generally treated worse than their white counterparts. ... So in those areas, the price of admission is you must speak ebonics as a way to show you can be trusted. But let's face it: there's a price of admission for biracial people to get along with some whites in those areas too. You must speak the way they do (without ebonics) or you will be alienated I think there are cultural expectations coming from both sides.

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Old 06-28-2013, 06:05 PM   #64
 
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Thanks for the compliment Samantha It's interesting you were told you are North African. Though I appreciate all cultures, admittedly I've had some unexplained, strong attraction to the culture (esp. the music and food), and people of North Africa in the past two years.

Like you, I don't know the exact location as it regards my African roots. I am hoping to find that out soon, since I'm about to re-take a ancestral DNA test (they couldn't determine the results from my first sample). I can't wait to find out ... Have you considered taking one of these tests?

As for your struggle with black people, not sure if this is true for you, but I found that some of that can be regional. I've found that people of ALL backgrounds in the US tend to be more rigid about their cultural/social expectations in areas that are more racially segregated (and generally more conservative). For example, I've found that coastal metropolitan communities tend to be far more tolerant of multi-cultural people. The times I've run into issues getting along w/some black people was when they lived in areas where they are segregated and generally treated worse than their white counterparts. ... So in those areas, the price of admission is you must speak ebonics as a way to show you can be trusted. But let's face it: there's a price of admission for biracial people to get along with some whites in those areas too. You must speak the way they do (without ebonics) or you will be alienated I think there are cultural expectations coming from both sides.
That is so interesting! I didn't know you could do that! You must be so excited! I must look into this, bc I would love to do that myself. I agree, region can definitely contribute to people's perception!
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Old 06-28-2013, 06:56 PM   #65
 
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Ironically, there is a thread speaking about Paula Deen's "n" word comment. I think that, in collaboration with this topic, it makes a further valid point of why nobody should say it. Who knows her reasoning, but my point is, we can't get mad when a non-black person uses that word, yet the "n" word is used perdominately in a specific race. It shows lack of respect.

The other day, I was speaking to my friend who was venting to me about some drama in her life concerning her boyfriend. She is biracial, like me, and her boyfriend is black. She kept calling him a n***A. I then proceeded to tell her about this exact thread and what we are all discussing. To me, it was a perfect example of someone, who if they were to have been called the "n" word, would have been angry, yet when she was angry, she was able to drop the "n" word like it was saying 'hello.'

This thread helped me examine her thought process/beliefs on using the word. So I thank everyone for this great discussion.
Good points! It makes no sense to adopt the word n***er (the destructive baby monster it is) when it seems convenient, then complain when someone else uses it as they will. The old "do as I say, not as I do" argument doesn't work and never worked.

In reaction to what your friend does, I confess (as someone biracial like y'all): I reserve a special, high place on my s**t list for biracial ppl who hurl n***er at black people I think the reason is that I'm never quite sure whether that person is seeing themselves as just black when they say it (One Drop Ruling themselves), or if they are thinking of their own whiteness (or non-blackness) and therefore are genuinely being racist (to try and separate themselves from their black ilk). Either way though, it's both self-deprecating and demeaning to others so it's pretty tacky. Someone multi-cultural or biracial could choose to embrace the good stuff about their heritages, rather than trash one or more. I think some of us mixed types struggle w/it, despite being relentlessly stereotyped as the future ambassadors of positive race relations. Some real pieces of work roam among us LOL

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Another layer of this problem is that blacks (and other minorities) claim to want to "move on" from being thought of as second class. However, their continued use of the word is only prolonging the divide.
I'm confused Bobby. Didn't you say you're OK with an Italian calling another Italian D**o? Italians - especially the darker ones whose Moorish ancestry clearly shows - also suffer discrimination in the US. In fact, many in the white community still separate themselves from Italians and look down on them because they aren't seen as white enough or smart or classy enough.
D**o I don't mind. W*p, however, I despise. In my family, we were conditioned that D**o is not offensive but W*p is. As for Italians being oppressed, that was definitely true at one point. They certainly weren't looked upon highly when my parents and grandparents came to the States. As for discrimation today, there will always be such that divide themelves from certain cultures but in the case of Italians, I haven't noticed it enough to be an issue.

BTW, Korkscrew, you could pass for Italian.
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Old 06-28-2013, 06:59 PM   #66
 
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I think things are better socially than in earlier days, but I do think that the African holocaust is downplayed in the U.S. for some reason.

It just seems odd that you can have a society where people were tortured for centuries and not expect to have any repercussions. Other peoples that have survived atrocities don't have that problem and unfortunately, it is because racism still exists.
The reason the history is downplayed is 1) guilt, and more importantly 2) it shatters the myth of American exceptionalism: that the United States was founded on the highest ideals of freedom and respect for human rights.

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It most definitely was not. I don't have a whole lot to contribute to this thread. I am mixed heritages but predominately "white" - Scottish & English on my mothers side, and Irish & Italian on my fathers side - my grandfather being a 2nd generation Italian American (his parents immigrated). For some reason, the Italian features are dominant in me. Dark hair, olive skin, dark eyes...I can look pale & "white" in the winter but get me in the sun & everything changes. As a child I had one very pale blond haired friend who was convinced I was "black" - like it was a bad thing - and have been called "that little Spanish girl" or asked "what are you??" and I definitely look more "ethnic" with my curly frizzy hair & a tan. However, I am not so purely one lineage that I identify as anything other than "white" if asked on a form. The "racism" I've experienced is nothing compared to many of you.

That being said - I always have wondered what grounds Americans have to be racist or suspicious of immigrants - yes some are here illegally but I think a lot of motivation behind that is to escape oppression, violence, or poverty in their homelands - when we European "white people" came here to escape many of the same things. And then proceeded to slaughter the native Americans & enslave blacks for hundreds of years. We make it damn near impossible to become an American citizen if you werent born here, but do we not remember what we've done?
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Old 06-29-2013, 11:18 AM   #67
 
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Thanks for the compliment Samantha It's interesting you were told you are North African. Though I appreciate all cultures, admittedly I've had some unexplained, strong attraction to the culture (esp. the music and food), and people of North Africa in the past two years.

Like you, I don't know the exact location as it regards my African roots. I am hoping to find that out soon, since I'm about to re-take a ancestral DNA test (they couldn't determine the results from my first sample). I can't wait to find out ... Have you considered taking one of these tests?

As for your struggle with black people, not sure if this is true for you, but I found that some of that can be regional. I've found that people of ALL backgrounds in the US tend to be more rigid about their cultural/social expectations in areas that are more racially segregated (and generally more conservative). For example, I've found that coastal metropolitan communities tend to be far more tolerant of multi-cultural people. The times I've run into issues getting along w/some black people was when they lived in areas where they are segregated and generally treated worse than their white counterparts. ... So in those areas, the price of admission is you must speak ebonics as a way to show you can be trusted. But let's face it: there's a price of admission for biracial people to get along with some whites in those areas too. You must speak the way they do (without ebonics) or you will be alienated I think there are cultural expectations coming from both sides.
That is so interesting! I didn't know you could do that! You must be so excited! I must look into this, bc I would love to do that myself. I agree, region can definitely contribute to people's perception!
Samantha, an excellent company to use for ancestral DNA testing is "23andme". Earlier this year they dropped their price from $300 to $100 in order to increase their sample collection for the purpose of genetic study. It's a company Dr. Henry Gates Jr. uses on at least one of his ongoing PBS TV series about ancestral genetics
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Old 06-29-2013, 11:42 AM   #68
 
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[QUOTE=bobby;2185590]
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D**o I don't mind. W*p, however, I despise. In my family, we were conditioned that D**o is not offensive but W*p is. As for Italians being oppressed, that was definitely true at one point. They certainly weren't looked upon highly when my parents and grandparents came to the States. As for discrimation today, there will always be such that divide themelves from certain cultures but in the case of Italians, I haven't noticed it enough to be an issue.
And in some African households, people are conditioned to believe n***er isn't a bad word. As for discrimination, I have friends who definitely suffer discrimination due to their Italian backgrounds. And it's a shame that so many negative stereotypes of Italians are depicted in the movies and in print, even to this day.

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BTW, Korkscrew, you could pass for Italian.
That's not really "passing" in my mind LOL. Italians, like so many ethnic groups I get "confused" for, often have at least 1/4 African ancestry. You and your Italian kinfolk have strong Moorish ancestry (North African) Maybe the Moors have something to do w/those healthy curls you have?
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Old 06-29-2013, 04:52 PM   #69
 
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Thanks for the compliment Samantha It's interesting you were told you are North African. Though I appreciate all cultures, admittedly I've had some unexplained, strong attraction to the culture (esp. the music and food), and people of North Africa in the past two years.

Like you, I don't know the exact location as it regards my African roots. I am hoping to find that out soon, since I'm about to re-take a ancestral DNA test (they couldn't determine the results from my first sample). I can't wait to find out ... Have you considered taking one of these tests?

As for your struggle with black people, not sure if this is true for you, but I found that some of that can be regional. I've found that people of ALL backgrounds in the US tend to be more rigid about their cultural/social expectations in areas that are more racially segregated (and generally more conservative). For example, I've found that coastal metropolitan communities tend to be far more tolerant of multi-cultural people. The times I've run into issues getting along w/some black people was when they lived in areas where they are segregated and generally treated worse than their white counterparts. ... So in those areas, the price of admission is you must speak ebonics as a way to show you can be trusted. But let's face it: there's a price of admission for biracial people to get along with some whites in those areas too. You must speak the way they do (without ebonics) or you will be alienated I think there are cultural expectations coming from both sides.
That is so interesting! I didn't know you could do that! You must be so excited! I must look into this, bc I would love to do that myself. I agree, region can definitely contribute to people's perception!
Samantha, an excellent company to use for ancestral DNA testing is "23andme". Earlier this year they dropped their price from $300 to $100 in order to increase their sample collection for the purpose of genetic study. It's a company Dr. Henry Gates Jr. uses on at least one of his ongoing PBS TV series about ancestral genetics
I wrote this down! I am going to see in my future, to try this company. Thank you so much for being so helpful.
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Old 06-29-2013, 05:52 PM   #70
 
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[QUOTE=Korkscrew;2185704]
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D**o I don't mind. W*p, however, I despise. In my family, we were conditioned that D**o is not offensive but W*p is. As for Italians being oppressed, that was definitely true at one point. They certainly weren't looked upon highly when my parents and grandparents came to the States. As for discrimation today, there will always be such that divide themelves from certain cultures but in the case of Italians, I haven't noticed it enough to be an issue.
And in some African households, people are conditioned to believe n***er isn't a bad word. As for discrimination, I have friends who definitely suffer discrimination due to their Italian backgrounds. And it's a shame that so many negative stereotypes of Italians are depicted in the movies and in print, even to this day.

Quote:
BTW, Korkscrew, you could pass for Italian.
That's not really "passing" in my mind LOL. Italians, like so many ethnic groups I get "confused" for, often have at least 1/4 African ancestry. You and your Italian kinfolk have strong Moorish ancestry (North African) Maybe the Moors have something to do w/those healthy curls you have?
I meant with your complexion and gorgeous head of curls you could pass for Italian. Ciao, Bella.

To my knowledge, I'm not aware of any Moorish ancestry and if I have it, it would be the generation before my grandparents. However, I very well could have it. Italians have definitely been depicted negatively in various movies. I just chose long ago not to let it bother me. Although, I was in a job interview one time and the guy interviewing me had an Italian last name. He made a reference to us sharing a commonality of being "Italian-American." I didn't say anything back but I thought, "Dude, enough of the hyphenation before the word American. Just call us 'American and be done with it."

Relavant to some black households teaching that the word n***er is not a bad word, well that's fine, just don't complain when someone else uses it. My view on the word D*** stems from the fact that when my dad was in the Air Force, he had the word tattooed on his upper arm. I guess that's why I just let it roll off my back when I hear it -- even from other nationalities. W**, however, I have been called -- and let's just say I fire back at the other person when I hear it.

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Old 06-29-2013, 06:57 PM   #71
 
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The reason why blacks can use the n-word and no other race can is because its our way of turning the negative output of the original word and slavery into a 'positive' word.
I would caution you about the word "we". Not all black ppl agree w/use of the word ******. Question for you: How, specifically, do you think using this word makes it positive? Please explain the specific benefit/s everyone gets from using it. (I've never received a reasonable answer to this question.) Thanks.

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When another race uses the n-word it basically takes out the 'fun' of it because you remind us what happened in the past. The only other race that I've seen use the n-word is Hispanics and I don't mind.
What "fun" is there in calling yourself some word whites invented and used against your ancestors to justify enslaving, raping, beating and murdering them? I'm pretty sure my African ancestors would feel I were spoiling their "fun" by using the word ****** in any context.



No, I don't get this. Not all "black" friends would agree w/this arbitrary attempt at linguistic micro-management.



People get to say what they want. But there are consequences. As much as people want words not to matter, they just do. They carry enormous symbolic, historical and emotional weight. Words start wars and keep peace. And it's totally unrealistic to expect that everyone else but you (and your ethnic group) should and will keep from using a politically loaded word.

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Racism isn't built on words it's built on actions.
Actually, racism is built on both.

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The day blacks will stop saying n**** is when we are on the same playing field as whites.
I think the day certain blacks stop saying ****** is the day they will be showing they respect themselves more.
Oh @Korkscrew how I love how you broke this down! everything you said was exactly what i was thinking. I don't use the word on my vocabulary because i find the word disrespectful and offensive. I hate of this double-standard some blacks have created in their minds "we can say it ya'll can't" mentality. The n word or any racial slur shouldn't be use because the are used as insults to one heritage/ethnicity. Hopefully people will stop being ignorant to certain things.



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Old 06-30-2013, 01:29 PM   #72
 
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I meant with your complexion and gorgeous head of curls you could pass for Italian. Ciao, Bella.
Thanks for complimenting my skin and curls Bobby. Like I said, I believe you are complimenting the outcome of an African-Caucasian mix

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To my knowledge, I'm not aware of any Moorish ancestry and if I have it, it would be the generation before my grandparents. However, I very well could have it. Italians have definitely been depicted negatively in various movies. I just chose long ago not to let it bother me. Although, I was in a job interview one time and the guy interviewing me had an Italian last name. He made a reference to us sharing a commonality of being "Italian-American." I didn't say anything back but I thought, "Dude, enough of the hyphenation before the word American. Just call us 'American and be done with it."
Oh the hyphenation thing. That could turn into a whole other discussion LOL Usually the terms African-American, African-Asian and African-Italian, etc., are being used redundantly and in a way that allows mono-racially white American citizens to just tag themselves as just “American” w/out revealing what their ethnic background is.

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Relavant to some black households teaching that the word n***er is not a bad word, well that's fine, just don't complain when someone else uses it. My view on the word D*** stems from the fact that when my dad was in the Air Force, he had the word tattooed on his upper arm. I guess that's why I just let it roll off my back when I hear it -- even from other nationalities. W**, however, I have been called -- and let's just say I fire back at the other person when I hear it.

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Again, I think this works both ways. I've met too many Italians who use racially derogatory words for themselves (sentimentally or not) but freak out when others use those words around them. I'm pretty sure my Italian friends wouldn't care for me using those words, and that makes sense. I respect them too much to use it. Just like I respect my African peeps (and myself) too much to ever use n****r. Meanwhile, I'm sorry to hear someone has called you any of those names. That's just crappy.


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Oh @Korkscrew how I love how you broke this down! everything you said was exactly what i was thinking. I don't use the word on my vocabulary because i find the word disrespectful and offensive. I hate of this double-standard some blacks have created in their minds "we can say it ya'll can't" mentality. The n word or any racial slur shouldn't be use because the are used as insults to one heritage/ethnicity. Hopefully people will stop being ignorant to certain things.



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Thanks hon. I too hope people will think more about these things. I think a lot of people from different backgrounds do it, so I'm glad you made that distinction here

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Old 07-01-2013, 12:23 AM   #73
 
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Thanks for complimenting my skin and curls Bobby. Like I said, I believe you are complimenting the outcome of an African-Caucasian mix
Hey, the outcome has been great whatever the mix is.

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Oh the hyphenation thing. That could turn into a whole other discussion LOL Usually the terms African-American, African-Asian and African-Italian, etc., are being used redundantly and in a way that allows mono-racially white American citizens to just tag themselves as just “American” w/out revealing what their ethnic background is.
That could turn into another thread indeed. My personal feeling is that while it sounds good in theory, it actually creates more division. Go to any other country, they just call us F*c*ing Americans. My parents came to the States at a time where the emphasis was to become Americanized, which is why they never taught us Italian.



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Again, I think this works both ways. I've met too many Italians who use racially derogatory words for themselves (sentimentally or not) but freak out when others use those words around them. I'm pretty sure my Italian friends wouldn't care for me using those words, and that makes sense. I respect them too much to use it. Just like I respect my African peeps (and myself) too much to ever use n****r. Meanwhile, I'm sorry to hear someone has called you any of those names. That's just crappy.
It totally works both ways. Again, I won't freak out if I hear the word D*** but W**, it's on like Donkey Kong. I got called that when competing in a track meet in high school. Some dude (I think he was black) said something like, "Hey W**, I bet you'd run faster if a plate of pasta was at the finish line." Being an 18-year old kid, it bothered me. When I was in grade school, I had a classmate that called me that a few times. Bothered me then but as a 41-year old adult, I've gotten the last laugh.

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Oh @Korkscrew how I love how you broke this down! everything you said was exactly what i was thinking. I don't use the word on my vocabulary because i find the word disrespectful and offensive. I hate of this double-standard some blacks have created in their minds "we can say it ya'll can't" mentality. The n word or any racial slur shouldn't be use because the are used as insults to one heritage/ethnicity. Hopefully people will stop being ignorant to certain things.



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Thanks hon. I too hope people will think more about these things. I think a lot of people from different backgrounds do it, so I'm glad you made that distinction here
Korkscrew, you broke it down better than anyone.
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Old 07-01-2013, 01:29 AM   #74
 
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Thanks for sharing your experiences.

I think several people on this thread, including you, have said some very insightful things. NC has a lot of insightful, smart posters IMO ... including many who I disagree with
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Old 07-02-2013, 12:51 AM   #75
 
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Thanks for sharing your experiences.

I think several people on this thread, including you, have said some very insightful things. NC has a lot of insightful, smart posters IMO ... including many who I disagree with
Well said, I know threads like this are sensitive topics like politics and religion but to me it's not a matter of who you agree with, you learn about each other. We can always talk about our curls.
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Old 01-28-2014, 02:25 PM   #76
 
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After that I was wondering if racism is making a comeback in a America and will it ever go away. I've dealt with racism a lot and its getting to the point where I think the US is putting a blind eye over racism and pretending it doesn't exists and slavery never happened.
First off, I am so sorry you had to deal with this! =(

Second, I don't necessarily think racism is making a comeback, because I don't ever think it went away. Do I think it will go away? Probably not since there will always be people who dislike others because of the color of their skin, their heritage, their family, their sexual orientation, and the list goes on. We'll always find a way to differentiate ourselves from one another, but I feel as if some people thrive on those differences to the point where it turns into racism and supremacy.

I'd be lying if I said I haven't experienced racism. I have experienced it more than I care to, that's for sure! My mother is of German/French/Native American descent and my father is African American, Native American and unsure of the rest (he speculates somewhere in Ireland at one point).

I wish we could take it away so that our future generations don't have to experience/deal with it. I think the first step is to teach our future generations love and not hate. I honestly believe that racism is something that is taught/learned, unfortunately.
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Old 02-21-2014, 04:39 PM   #77
 
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Racism has never went away. People may try to cover it up, but it's always lurking right beneath the surface.
I agree with this. Sadly, I don't think it will ever completely "go away" as long as people have functioning eyes. That might be pessimistic of me, but I guess I'm being realistic. I face racism often as a Latina, and can only imagine what my black neighbors go through. For example, that horrible story that the OP posted. To be accused of being a thief when it was an honest mistake.. just because of the color of your skin... grrrr!
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Old 02-21-2014, 04:58 PM   #78
 
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Video that made me cry a river (at work, I was lucky nobody saw me with puffy red eyes) and also might make people feel more hopeful about humankind: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ynYwTU7z6BI
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Old 02-21-2014, 05:46 PM   #79
 
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^^^made me cry too. I have hope for the human race.
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Old 03-26-2014, 05:02 PM   #80
 
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When I was 6, I never knew what racism. I went to a predominant white elementary school and I never really experienced racism from the kids until 1st Grade. I remember when it was black history month they never spent time to talk about it and the reason why we have it. They only talked about MLK and that was for 5 minutes. Anyways everybody would stare at me and the throughout the whole entire day. The kids kept asking me about my hair and then touching it without permission. I complained to the teachers about it and they just ignored me. There was one time I forgot to put lotion on and one boy asked me if I was trying to be white and that it would be better if I was (around 4th grade). After a while I began to hate myself and wish I was white. I realized what I was thinking was wrong so in 5th grade I told my dad to take me out of the school and I began a self love journey.

Now I go to a diverse middle school which I like.

I went to a laundry mat a few days ago with my family and by accident I took a mans basket. After returning it to him, he came up to my family saying "Do you speak English?" We answered yes and out of no where we hear "You f*****g thieves, why the hell did you touch my basket? We don't need you people in our country, you should've stuck to picking cotton!" The man left and of course we were mad as hell.

After that I was wondering if racism is making a comeback in a America and will it ever go away. I've dealt with racism a lot and its getting to the point where I think the US is putting a blind eye over racism and pretending it doesn't exists and slavery never happened.
I also went to an all white school while in middle school. I was in an academically gifted program so I was chosen to be "bused" out of my school to integrate a white school in the 6th grade, [along with 9 others, 4 boys and 6 girls].

Due to my being mixed I had more problems with my people than Caucasian people. I did have one problem though...

There was a girl in my class who I thought was my friend. We would talk in class about many things and share beauty tips. It seemed there was never a problem. One day I was on my way to gym and I saw her with her friends in the hall. As I passed, I said "Hey Liz, see you in gym class" and kept on walking. Then I heard her call me a n___a, and state she didn't have anything to do with me.

I was so shocked because my mom taught us that anyone could be a n___a because the definition was a "no class, ignorant, undignified person" and so there are n___as in all nationalities. Secondly, because I knew my mom was breaking her back since the death of my dad to provide for us and to give us a decent upbringing...I was one of the best dressed in that school! So I felt she had insulted my mom.

By the time I got to the gym I was so hurt and angry that I was in tears, I stopped by the stairs and turned to go back to her, [not knowing what I would say], but by then she was coming up with her friends. I didn't think, just grabbed her and threw her down the stairs. Thank God it was a short flight, [about 6-8 steps]. I was shocked at me, it seemed like a bad dream from start to finish.

I ended up in the principal's office, they called my mom and she came up. I refuse to apologize until she apologized to me for calling me a name. After that there were no more problems. They couldn't make me a disciplinary problem because I had no problems before, [or after].

Ah, well...

I think racism has increased since the election of Pres. Obama. So many are angry that he is "in charge" and they cannot take it out on him so they "attack" at our level.

I have a tendency to let people know that exercising their racism at me can become a very "expensive habit". People acting out their prejudices against black people is common place because so many do nothing about it legally.

We have rights, and we need to stop pretending that racism doesn't exist as long as those who are racist continue to behave as though it does.

Blessings!
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