News just in GOP Playing the blame game

I found an interesting article about the mess going on with the GOP and McCain campaign. Here ya go:

With despair rising even among many of John McCain’s own advisers, influential Republicans inside and outside his campaign are engaged in an intense round of blame-casting and rear-covering — much of it virtually conceding that an Election Day rout is likely.
A McCain interview published Thursday in The Washington Times sparked the latest and most nasty round of finger-pointing, with senior GOP hands close to President Bush and top congressional aides denouncing the candidate for what they said was an unfocused message and poorly executed campaign.
McCain told the Times that the administration “let things get completely out of hand” through eight years of bad decisions about Iraq, global warming, and big spending.
The candidate’s strategists in recent days have become increasingly vocal in interviews and conference calls about what they call unfair news media coverage and Barack Obama’s wide financial advantage — both complaints laying down a post-election storyline for why their own efforts proved ineffectual.
These public comments offer a whiff of an increasingly acrid behind-the-scenes GOP meltdown — a blame game played out through not-for-attribution comments to reporters that operatives know will find their way into circulation.
Top Republican officials have let it be known they are distressed about McCain’s organization. Coordination between the McCain campaign and Republican National Committee, always uneven, is now nearly dysfunctional, with little high-level contact and intelligence-sharing between the two.
“There is no communication,” lamented one top Republican. “It drives you crazy.”
At his Northern Virginia headquarters, some McCain aides are already speaking of the campaign in the past tense. Morale, even among some of the heartiest and most loyal staffers, has plummeted. And many past and current McCain advisers are warring with each other over who led the candidate astray.
One well-connected Republican in the private sector was shocked to get calls and resumes in the past few days from what he said were senior McCain aides — a breach of custom for even the worst-off campaigns.
“It’s not an extraordinarily happy place to be right now,” said one senior McCain aide. “I’m not gonna lie. It’s just unfortunate.”
“If you really want to see what ‘going negative’ is in politics, just watch the back-stabbing and blame game that we’re starting to see,” said Mark McKinnon, the ad man who left the campaign after McCain wrapped up the GOP primary. “And there’s one common theme: Everyone who wasn’t part of the campaign could have done better.”
“The cake is baked,” agreed a former McCain strategist. “We’re entering the finger-pointing and positioning-for-history part of the campaign. It’s every man for himself now.”
A circular firing squad is among the most familiar political rituals of a campaign when things aren’t going well. But it is rare for campaign aides to be so openly participating in it well before Election Day.
One current senior campaign official gave voice to this “Law of the Jungle” ethic, defending the campaign against second-guessers who say it was a mistake to throw away his "experience" message in an attempt to match Obama’s “change” mantra.

“Everybody agreed with the strategy,” said this official. “We were unlikely to be successful without being aggressive and taking risks.”
Running as a steady hand and basing a campaign on Obama’s sparse résumé was a political loser, it was decided.
“The pollsters and the entire senior leadership of campaign believe that experience vs. change was not a winning message and formulation, the same way it was no winning formula with Hillary Clinton.”
Beyond the obvious reputation-burnishing — much of it by professional operatives whose financial livelihoods depend on ensuring that they are not blamed for a bad campaign — there is a more substantive dimension. Barring a big McCain comeback, and a turnabout in numerous congressional races where the party is in trouble, the GOP is on the brink of a soul-searching debate about what to do to reclaim power. Much of that debate will hinge on appraisals of what McCain could have done differently.
That is why his criticisms of Bush hit such an exposed nerve Thursday. Was McCain hobbled by party label at a time when the incumbent president is so unpopular? Or did his uneven response to the financial rescue — and endorsement of such nonconservative ideas as a massive government purchase of homeowner mortgages — seal his fate?
Dan Schnur, a McCain communications adviser during his 2000 run and now a political analyst at the University of Southern California, said McCain should step in to halt the defeatism and self-serving leaks — an epidemic of incontinence — on his own team.
The GOP & McCain camp are losing it and they know it and people wonder why McCain would use attack tactics and try to justify them...
Turtles: omg please don't put that in your moo moo

Nej: too late... moo moo has been infiltrated.
Hubby and I were commenting last night that McCain passing on him was probably the best thing that ever happened to Minnesota Governor Tim Pawlenty. How many people had ever heard of him outside of Minnesota, and there he was on CBS last night talking to Katie Couric about the future of the Republican party.
Minneapolis, MN
If the Republicans want to have a chance to win in the next elections, they better find out what went wrong and correct it. It's a combination of things: Bush, McCain's ineffective candidacy, the economy, policy differences, etc. The republicans catered too long to the religious right and into trickle-down economics.

I'm a moderate and I could've gone either way...I even liked McCain at the beginning. I saw him as a moderate and I thought he could change the republican party for the better. The more I got to know him, the less I liked him. The more I got to know Obama, the more I liked Obama.

I think we're tired of the rich popular kids bullying us and picking on us (to use a high school analogy). The republican party better make some fundamental changes in their party...become more moderate, become more diverse, listen to the needs of the average joe (and not the plumber...LOL), stop using fear-mongering tactics, and actually engage in an intellectual conversation why they think their policies are better. If they do that, they will gain my respect...maybe or maybe not my vote (depending on how they measure up to their opponents)...but definitely my respect.
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It won't happen, but I'd love to see a permanent split in the Republican party. Let Palin become the leader of the bigoted, evangelical, and proudly ignorant base of the party, and let the reasonable, small "c" conservatives start there own party. Maybe then we'd finally have a real viable alternative come election time.
Eres o te haces?
here's what David Frum wrote today:

"A generation ago, Republicans dominated among college graduates. In 1984 and 1988, Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush won states like California, Pennsylvania and Connecticut – states that have been “blue” for a generation. (America’s least educated state, West Virginia, went for Michael Dukakis in 1988.)

Those days are long gone. Since 1988, Democrats have become more conservative on economics – and Republicans have become more conservative on social issues.

College-educated Americans have come to believe that their money is safe with Democrats – but that their values are under threat from Republicans. And there are more and more of these college-educated Americans all the time.

So the question for the GOP is: Will it pursue them? To do so will involve painful change, on issues ranging from the environment to abortion. And it will involve potentially even more painful changes of style and tone: toward a future that is less overtly religious, less negligent with policy, and less polarizing on social issues. That’s a future that leaves little room for Sarah Palin – but the only hope for a Republican recovery."


i suspect i have some idea of how the Palin-ideologue stream of the republican party will try to marginalize Frum (he's not a "real" american being jewish and born and raised in Canada by *gasp* "liberal" parents), but he has a point.
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Your post, Rou (may I call you that?), made me think... I wonder if the right will look at this election and think, "We need to move further left and reach across the aisle," or will they think, "We need to move further to the right to compensate."

I hope it's the former.
"And politically correct is the worst term, not just because it’s dismissive, but because it narrows down the whole social justice spectrum to this idea that it’s about being polite instead of about dismantling the oppressive social structure of power.
Fun Fact: When you actively avoid being “PC,” you’re not being forward-thinking or unique. You’re buying into systems of oppression that have existed since before you were even born, and you’re keeping those systems in place."
Stolen.
Your post, Rou (may I call you that?), made me think... I wonder if the right will look at this election and think, "We need to move further left and reach across the aisle," or will they think, "We need to move further to the right to compensate."

I hope it's the former.
Originally Posted by MichelleBFT
I'm hoping it is as well. That's the feeling I got last night from both speeches. Hard-core Republicans will probably be angry and such, but by the time the new administration rolls around, and during its first few months, I hope the bi-partisan thing happens.
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It's frustrating to see what could otherwise be a good, strong party fighting amongst themselves. Nothing ever gets solved by playing the blame game.
Your post, Rou (may I call you that?)
Originally Posted by MichelleBFT
by all means, many do...



... made me think... I wonder if the right will look at this election and think, "We need to move further left and reach across the aisle," or will they think, "We need to move further to the right to compensate."
and that's what Frum wrote in his article, the first part of it was talking about a move to the right as opposed to a move to the centre.
My blog:

http://labellatestarossa.blogspot.ca/

Little Mother of all the Roaches, President-for-Life of the MAC Harlots!
Your post, Rou (may I call you that?), made me think... I wonder if the right will look at this election and think, "We need to move further left and reach across the aisle," or will they think, "We need to move further to the right to compensate."

I hope it's the former.
Originally Posted by MichelleBFT
I hope it's the latter. I remember when being a Republican meant fiscal responsibility and small government. If only the right would keep going right then we could have a third party made up of original republicans, for lack of a better description.

I'd love to see the hate mongering Palins and Bachmans of this world marginalized.
< member since 2006. No idea where 1969 came from.
Your post, Rou (may I call you that?), made me think... I wonder if the right will look at this election and think, "We need to move further left and reach across the aisle," or will they think, "We need to move further to the right to compensate."

I hope it's the former.
Originally Posted by MichelleBFT
I hope it's the latter. I remember when being a Republican meant fiscal responsibility and small government. If only the right would keep going right then we could have a third party made up of original republicans, for lack of a better description.

I'd love to see the hate mongering Palins and Bachmans of this world marginalized.
Originally Posted by eche428
I suppose if the group moving right creates an actual split instead of trying to bind itself to a more moderate portion of the Republican party, it could be a good thing.
"And politically correct is the worst term, not just because it’s dismissive, but because it narrows down the whole social justice spectrum to this idea that it’s about being polite instead of about dismantling the oppressive social structure of power.
Fun Fact: When you actively avoid being “PC,” you’re not being forward-thinking or unique. You’re buying into systems of oppression that have existed since before you were even born, and you’re keeping those systems in place."
Stolen.
I hope the Repubs take the time to regroup and reevaluate the party. They need to look at real issues, meet with real people and then champion the people's causes, not just their own. In a lot of ways they've sold their souls to big business and the way far right wing. A repub political analyst said last night "we need to get back to our parties' basics" and I couldn't agree more.
I hope the Repubs take the time to regroup and reevaluate the party. They need to look at real issues, meet with real people and then champion the people's causes, not just their own. In a lot of ways they've sold their souls to big business and the way far right wing. A repub political analyst said last night "we need to get back to our parties' basics" and I couldn't agree more.
Originally Posted by Amandacurls
ITA, especially with the bolded. How do they expect people to support them if they aren't really catering to the people's issues and what not? I think the Republicans need to put away their costume, Halloween is over please go back to your basics.
Turtles: omg please don't put that in your moo moo

Nej: too late... moo moo has been infiltrated.
I've been looking at Fox News a bit more lately, just to see what they are saying over there. Not surprising to see an "every man for himself" mentality in the GOP at the end.

Definitely curious to see what sorts of soul searching and self correction they will undertake. Frum's points are all quite valid.
"Great minds discuss ideas; Average minds discuss events; Small minds discuss people."

"I think that somehow, we learn who we really are and then we live with that decision."
- Eleanor Roosevelt (both quotes)

(taking a break from posting starting late august 2009)
Your post, Rou (may I call you that?), made me think... I wonder if the right will look at this election and think, "We need to move further left and reach across the aisle," or will they think, "We need to move further to the right to compensate."

I hope it's the former.
Originally Posted by MichelleBFT
I hope it's the latter. I remember when being a Republican meant fiscal responsibility and small government. If only the right would keep going right then we could have a third party made up of original republicans, for lack of a better description.

I'd love to see the hate mongering Palins and Bachmans of this world marginalized.
Originally Posted by eche428
I think that means Libertarian today...

ITA with your last statement.
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Med/Coarse, porous curly.
I've been wondering for a long time now what it will take for moderate, traditional Republicans to take back their own party and force the extremists to play in their own sandbox, so to speak. It seems like each election cycle the Republican candidate (or one of them, in this case, and I don't mean McCain) gets more and more radically conservative. I hope for the sake of the Republican Party as well as the U.S. that this election catalyzes a change within the party, but from the chanting of "Palin in 2012" I've been hearing, I'm not sure it will. If it does, maybe it should start with an acknowledgment that fundamentalist extremists of any religion are no one's "base" in a free and democratic society, and ought not be pandered to.
It's frustrating to see what could otherwise be a good, strong party fighting amongst themselves. Nothing ever gets solved by playing the blame game.
Originally Posted by Amandacurls
Well it had to happen. There are too many fighting factions. And it all started with Reagan bringing in the religious right. That was key to his win and Goldwater and the more libertarian types were mad as hell that the social conservatives started taking over. This is what I meant about a Frankenstein ticket. McCain is RINO, he's a lot like Lieberman. He could be a Democrat but should probably be an Independent. Maybe in 2010 we'll see another Contract for America, and some Republicans who actually follow through. But this is politics, both parties actually go through cycles. And Republicans are not going to move left. McCain is proof that moving left and "bipartisanship" will not work. Why choose Republican Lite when you can get the real thing in a Dem.
I don't think anyone is suggesting that the Republican party become like democrats. I do think they have gotten away from their original values of fiscal conservatism and small government. They spend as much as the democrats and for programs that the average american isn't too happy about. I say if I"m going to be taxed, then at least let it help the average american...not big corporations, not on a war that most people (including most conservatives now) disagree with.
The Republican party says it's for small government, but they are meddling more in people's lives than democrats. Leave my civil liberties alone, thank you! I don't need some self-interested, rich man telling me what I can and cannot do in my bedroom (unless it's my husband...LOL...oh yeah, he isn't rich!) I don't need a politician to be my preacher...not a good mix at all.

If republicans could get back to the basics, they would have a good platform. I'm still not sure if I personally would vote for them, but I would listen to what they had to say and if they made the most sense, I would vote for them.

They also have a public image of being racist. And, although, many as individuals may not be...and, to be fair, Bush's cabinet is more diverse than would be expected...Colin Powell and Condoleeza Rice...still, as a party, it's not diverse at all. I think racist might be too extreme of a word to use to generalize this, although I do think racism can play a role in this. The republican party seems to pretty much cater to the rich, white male...and until that image changes, it's going to get harder to get support from the middle class, from many women, and from minorities.
That's right, I said it! I wear scrunchies!!

I am a sulfate washing, cone slabbing, curly lovin' s.o.b. The CG police haven't caught me yet.


3a/3b

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