Oh, Saria, (part two)

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As always, sounds great. I have never cooked them that high before, and I usually cover them for a little bit. I can't wait to try this. Thanks for warning me about the smoke, kids will love this.

Your landlady hasn't been won over by wonderful smells from your place after all this time?

ETA: Just saw the next post, thanks. I don't have a cast iron pan, just a roasting one.
Roasting pan is fine, just that my cast-iron is the perfect size for one bird, plus it doesn't stick, and retains heat really well.
Haha, she probably wonders how a professional cook is managing to produce so much smoke in her kitchen.
In other news, I continue to be exasperated by my roommate's complete lack of appreciation for good food. The concept of a lot of foods tasting best right when they're made, when piping hot, is impossible to convey. I don't know how many times I've had something, and his response was "maybe later". No, a plate of pasta can't wait until later because it will dry out, get gummy, and not be good. No, a souffle really can't wait. No, baked pancakes can't wait. Ironically if he happens to be around when a cake or pie is coming out of the oven, it's impossible to convey the concept that those things have to cool before being cut. Grrr. He developed a bad habit when he was with his parents of eating dinner very late.
I don't cook for him anymore because aside from this, I got annoyed at making things that he had no idea what they were, didn't bother to ask, then would go on his merry way since he had no real desire to eat them because he never bothered to ask what something was. Mostly, considering how vegetable-focused my cooking is, even when he has never had a bunch of the things I cooked, he couldn't muster up any enthusiasm since his world revolves around meat.

Obviously roast chicken is not something I can make for just me, so I thought he would have some when dinner was ready. But no. He continued to sit in front of the TV for hours. Anyway, I tossed the last of the spaghetti and what was left of the dressed salad. I put the chicken away.
Well, at twelve, about four hours after I had finished dinner, I find him in the kitchen, pulling a plate out of the microwave. He tells me how's he's trying out my chicken. I wanted to tell him to go to hell.

Last edited by Saria; 06-20-2010 at 11:13 PM.
He's a moron.
Originally Posted by ninja dog
Yep.
How can someone be so stupid as to not appreciate good food that they don't even have to prepare?!

That yogurt mousse and strawberries made me drool on myself. Now my shirt is wet, thanks.

I've never made anything with eggplant! I picked one up at the grocery yesterday, looked at it, then put it back because I didn't have a clue what to do with it. The only eggplant DH has ever tried was eggplant parm and he didn't like it at ALL. He's not big on mushy and this stuff was uber mushy so I'm not sure I can make anything eggplant he'll like.

That pizza! OMG. We had one similar to that from a farmer's market last year and I could have eaten a dozen of them. The fresh squash was soooo good! One of the vendors had his traveling pizza oven and they were selling like hotcakes! (hot pizzas..whatever)

I am definitely starving after reading through this thread, time for some dinner!




Byron,GA> Charleston, SC> Jacksonville, FL> Guilford, CT> Rohnert Park, CA! A southern drawl in sunny Cali! .
The amount of time from slipping on the peel and landing on the pavement is exactly one bananosecond.
I do have a secret yen for pink in unexpected places. ~ninja dog
I've decided that I'll never get down to my original weight, and I'm OK with that--After all, 8 pounds 2 oz. is just not realistic.
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 15,533
In other news, I continue to be exasperated by my roommate's complete lack of appreciation for good food. The concept of a lot of foods tasting best right when they're made, when piping hot, is impossible to convey. I don't know how many times I've had something, and his response was "maybe later". No, a plate of pasta can't wait until later because it will dry out, get gummy, and not be good. No, a souffle really can't wait. No, baked pancakes can't wait. Ironically if he happens to be around when a cake or pie is coming out of the oven, it's impossible to convey the concept that those things have to cool before being cut. Grrr. He developed a bad habit when he was with his parents of eating dinner very late.
I don't cook for him anymore because aside from this, I got annoyed at making things that he had no idea what they were, didn't bother to ask, then would go on his merry way since he had no real desire to eat them because he never bothered to ask what something was. Mostly, considering how vegetable-focused my cooking is, even when he has never had a bunch of the things I cooked, he couldn't muster up any enthusiasm since his world revolves around meat.

Obviously roast chicken is not something I can make for just me, so I thought he would have some when dinner was ready. But no. He continued to sit in front of the TV for hours. Anyway, I tossed the last of the spaghetti and what was left of the dressed salad. I put the chicken away.
Well, at twelve, about four hours after I had finished dinner, I find him in the kitchen, pulling a plate out of the microwave. He tells me how's he's trying out my chicken. I wanted to tell him to go to hell.
Originally Posted by Saria
Saria, if I could move, I would pay for the privilege of rooming with you, and you bet I'd do all the cleaning up.
Don't pay him any attention. The rest of us know how good he's got it, the dummy. He'll be sorry.
He's a moron.
Originally Posted by ninja dog
Yep.
Originally Posted by ruralcurls
Seriously. What an idiot.
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You're all so sweet.
It does take out the enthusiasm of cooking when food just ends up sitting there.
All this time and his supposed desire to learn to cook, and he has ordered takeout every single day he has lived here.

Spring, I linked the first thread and I did a fair amount of eggplant cooking for that one, including eggplant parm. The eggplant parm I like and make is more in the Italian style though instead of the Italian American (I don't care for taking a crispy food and dousing it in sauce rendering it soggy for the most part). It's peak-season eggplant sliced into rounds, brushed with oil, and broiled briefly. Then layered with a simple fresh tomato sauce (just ripe tomatoes cut up and thrown into a pan with basil and cooked for maybe 10 minutes until soft then put through the food mill, a little olive oil added), fresh mozzarella, torn basil, and topped with fresh breadcrumbs and parm. It goes into the oven to cook until bubbly, golden, and crispy-topped. It's so good I almost ate the whole thing myself last summer. When eggplants come into season I'll have to make it again!
Oh Saria....

I love eggplant parm. My mouth was watering as you were describing how you make your eggplant parm. Can you post the recipe for your eggplant parm? Or you can PM if you prefer.

P.S. when is the peak season for eggplant?

TIA
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I was surprised DH tried it at all because he hates parmesan cheese. We were at a cookout and I don't think he knew what it was and he didn't want to be rude and not eat it after putting it on his plate. We were at a huge Italian families home and the momma made the parm and everyone was raving about it so I didn't want to get lynched, but yeah, it was soggy and I'm not crazy about that.

I was thinking I could just grill some rounds brushed with olive oil for us to try at first. Eggplant in its naked state.




Byron,GA> Charleston, SC> Jacksonville, FL> Guilford, CT> Rohnert Park, CA! A southern drawl in sunny Cali! .
The amount of time from slipping on the peel and landing on the pavement is exactly one bananosecond.
I do have a secret yen for pink in unexpected places. ~ninja dog
I've decided that I'll never get down to my original weight, and I'm OK with that--After all, 8 pounds 2 oz. is just not realistic.
Oh Saria....

I love eggplant parm. My mouth was watering as you were describing how you make your eggplant parm. Can you post the recipe for your eggplant parm? Or you can PM if you prefer.

P.S. when is the peak season for eggplant?

TIA
Originally Posted by curly66
Sure, I will post a recipe a little later.

Eggplant comes into season soon, just as other nightshades like peppers do. Tomatoes will be at their peak soon (they're popping up now, but July will be when they really sing). That's why all of these things taste so good together--- what grows together goes together. Eggplant in season is sweet with no bitterness, rendering the classic step of salting first useless (though this does help them absorb a bit less oil).

Spring, I made braised whole fairytale eggplant in the first thread (a really cute, tiny type). In that, you make slits in them and put a sliver of garlic in. Into a hot pan, sprinkled with plenty of salt. They braise in a bit of water until tender, and get showered with lots of chopped herbs and get some drops of sherry vinegar. It's really simple, but very good!

Oh, the roommate actually sent me a text last night when I was at work asking me where I keep the vinegar. I was tempted to tell him in a locked chest under my bed.
It's foreign to me to not know even the tiniest bit about a kitchen, to the point where you need to be told where vinegar is. Before I did any cooking and was still a young girl, I could have gotten vinegar for you!
I got home to find my walnut and roasted peanut oils, which I keep refrigerated, out on the counter on a hot, humid day.

Last edited by Saria; 06-22-2010 at 09:37 AM.
Did the chickens today, they are amazing!!!! Thank you. Girls and I pretty much finished one, I might need to start making 3!

We have to eat early on Tuesdays, so we will probably come back and help my husband eat the other one. He probably won't have any left for lunch tomorrow.

Saria, thank you.

The best part, it is sooo easy to do.

Thanks for the warning about the smoke-I probably would have flipped otherwise.
Oh, that's so great! I'm so glad you liked them.
I wish I had people to gobble up roast chicken.
The smoke is a bit alarming, but the result is worth it and the chickens cook really fast, too.

As for eggplant parm:

2 medium eggplants
Salt and freshly ground pepper
Olive oil
Fresh tomato sauce (you need about a cup or so, depending on how saucy you like it)
Basil leaves, torn into pieces (some 6 or 8 leaves)
4 oz fresh mozzarella, thinly sliced
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
Fresh breadcrumbs, optional (for a bit of additional crunch on top, but not necessary)

Lightly oil a 2-quart gratin dish.
Preheat the broiler. Slice the eggplant into 1/3 to 1/2 inch thick rounds. If you have fresh market eggplant, proceed. Otherwise sprinkle with salt and let stand 30 minutes over a colander. Blot dry.
Brush both sides of the rounds with olive oil and broil 5 to 6 inches from the heat until browned. Broil the second side, remove, and season lightly with salt and pepper. The eggplant will look dry.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
Warm the tomato sauce with half the basil. Taste for seasoning. Spread about a third of the sauce on the bottom of the dish, then make an overlapping layer of eggplant. Top with mozzarella, the rest of the basil, and sprinkle with Parmesan. Make another eggplant layer and top with remaining sauce, mozzarella and parmesan. If you have fresh breadcrumbs, sprinkle over the top and drizzle a bit of olive oil.
Bake in the middle rack until bubbling and golden, about 30 minutes.

Fresh Tomato Sauce (this makes more than you need, so either cut it in half or just make a full batch since it's a delicious sauce that you can use for a lot of stuff)

3 lbs ripe tomatoes, quartered
3 tbsp fresh basil, chopped, or 1 tbsp chopped marjoram
Salt and freshly ground pepper
2 tbsp olive oil or butter

Put the tomatoes in a pot with the basil and cover. Cook over medium high heat, checking to make sure the pan isn't dry (the tomatoes will give off their juice fairly quick, but just in case). After about 10 minutes, the tomatoes should have broken down. Pass them through a food mill.
If the sauce seems thin to you, put it in the pan and reduce a bit (I've always found it just right and never need to do this though).
Season with salt and pepper and stir in the oil. I find it actually needs very little salt since the tomatoes are so sweet and flavorful.
Thank you Saria for posting the recipe....I am looking forward to making this.

Does it matter which type of tomatoes I get for the sauce?
Curl Type: 3B/C thick shoulder length brunette
Favorite Products: Elucence Moisture Balancing Conditioner, Biotera Styling Gel found @ Sally's, Trader Joe's Nourish, Shea Moisture Retention Shampoo
They should just be local, in season tomatoes. Heirloom, beefsteak, plum, really doesn't matter too much (I use heirloom because I can't resist them really). If you can't get local, they should have a distinct aroma that tells you you're buying a ripe, flavorful tomato. No smell, no flavor.
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I made creamed corn!

I'm eating it now.

I'm a happy camper.

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