What to do with 10 oz. of unsweetened gourmet chocolate

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  • 1 Post By sew and sew
  • 1 Post By Saria
  • 1 Post By Eilonwy

I picked up some Ghirardelli's 100% cocoa at Grocery Outlet (love that store) last week. The deal was too good to pass up.

I'm looking for ideas as I've never used cocoa in baking (only powdered form premixed stuff). I entered it in the recipe search at cooks.com and wasn't that interested in what was coming up.

Any suggestions would be much appreciated!
“It was only a sunny smile and little it cost in the giving but like morning light it scattered the night and made the day worth living.” - F. Scott Fitzgerald
Anything really. You would never use sweetened cocoa in baking. Make real hot cocoa (or if you have some good chocolate, add it in and you'll have hot chocolate, if you prefer). Cocoa brownies. Chocolate cake. Cocoa wafers. Chocolate shortbread. Fudge sauce. I am guessing it is natural cocoa, not Dutch-processed (alkalized) Really doesn't make much difference in most recipes though.

Edit: You do mean cocoa powder, right? Unsweetened chocolate is not the same thing. That's actual chocolate (100% cAcAO not cOcOA 99% if it's Scharffen Berger). You can use one where you would use the other, but changes in amounts have to be made.

If you bought chocolate, the first thing that comes to mind is the obvious one: classic brownies. Classic brownies are made with unsweetened chocolate as opposed to bittersweet brownies or cocoa brownies. Another idea is a torte made with the chocolate grated. And these really chocolate-y cookies made the whipping (sponge) method, which makes them airy, but densely chocolate-y all at the same time.

Last edited by Saria; 02-06-2010 at 01:09 AM.
Anything really. You would never use sweetened cocoa in baking. Make real hot cocoa (or if you have some good chocolate, add it in and you'll have hot chocolate, if you prefer). Cocoa brownies. Chocolate cake. Cocoa wafers. Chocolate shortbread. Fudge sauce. I am guessing it is natural cocoa, not Dutch-processed (alkalized) Really doesn't make much difference in most recipes though.

Edit: You do mean cocoa powder, right? Unsweetened chocolate is not the same thing. That's actual chocolate (100% cAcAO not cOcOA 99% if it's Scharffen Berger). You can use one where you would use the other, but changes in amounts have to be made.

If you bought chocolate, the first thing that comes to mind is the obvious one: classic brownies. Classic brownies are made with unsweetened chocolate as opposed to bittersweet brownies or cocoa brownies. Another idea is a torte made with the chocolate grated. And these really chocolate-y cookies made the whipping (sponge) method, which makes them airy, but densely chocolate-y all at the same time.
Originally Posted by Saria
Oops, this stuff is cAcAo not cOcOa like I wrote. I'm thinking about making the terrine pictured on the package. The only issue there is that I would have to spring for a few more ingredients that I really shouldn't on my budget. It looks tempting though. Already on hand I have more basic ingredients like flour, brown and granulated sugar, butter, vanilla and salt.

Thanks for the input! The cookies you describe sound good...possibly doable.
“It was only a sunny smile and little it cost in the giving but like morning light it scattered the night and made the day worth living.” - F. Scott Fitzgerald
You could also go savory and make a batch of chili to which you add some of that unsweetened chocolate.
http://leitesculinaria.com/1339/reci...eye-chili.html
Mole also contains chocolate, depending on what type of mole.

French Silk pie can also be made with unsweetened chocolate, as can this pie:
http://leitesculinaria.com/3673/reci...cream-pie.html

Chocolate Layer Cake
http://leitesculinaria.com/2293/reci...ayer-cake.html

http://www.foodandwine.com/ingredien...A6A09498DCA3F0

This is delicious and intensely chocolate-y:
http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2...ond-torte.html

http://leitesculinaria.com/3199/reci...ocha-cake.html

http://leitesculinaria.com/3276/reci...a-cookies.html

http://leitesculinaria.com/17667/rec...wnie-bars.html

Robert's Chocolate Cookies (by Alice Medrich, though the original is on the back of the Scharffen Berger box):

9 to 10 oz unsweetened Scharffen Berger unsweetened chocolate, or 6 oz of any other unsweetened chocolate plus 3 to 4 oz premium bittersweet chocolate
1/3 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp salt
4 tbsp unsalted butter
2 large eggs, room temperature
1 1/3 cups sugar
1 1/2 tsp finely ground, freshly ground coffee
1 tsp vanilla extract
1/2 cup walnut pieces (optional)
2 cookie sheets, lined with parchment paper

Divide the Scharffen Bergen chocolate into two portions: chop 6 oz for melting and 3 to 4 oz into chunks about the size of large chips. If using another brand, use the unsweetened for melting and the bittersweet for chunks. Set aside.
(The reason for this is that Scharffen Bergen unsweetened is less harsh and better quality than a lot of unsweetened chocolate, but if yous is a good quality, you could certainly go ahead with all unsweetened)

Combine the flour, baking powder, and salt in a small bowl and whisk together thoroughly. Set aside. Melt the butter with the 6 oz of chocolate in a double boiler over barely simmering water, stirring occasionally, until melted and smooth. Remove from heat and set aside. (You can always melt chocolate in the microwave too, just make sure to stir it in intervals and don't burn it!)

Beat the eggs with the sugar, coffee, and vanilla with a mixer until pale and thick, about 5 minutes (the mixture will be aerated and hit what is known as the ribbon stage in that you pick up the whisk and the eggs fall off it in thick ribbons; I do this by hand for longer since I have no mixer--- good workout). Stir in the chocolate mixture with a spatula. Stir in the flour mixture followed by the chocolate chunks and nuts, if using them. Cover and refrigerate until firm, about an hour, or up to 4 days.

Preheat the oven to 350. Position the racks in the upper and lower thirds of the oven. Drop level tablespoons of batter for small cookies, or heaping tablespoons for large ones, 2 inches apart on the sheets. Bake until the cookies are puffed, dry, and crackled on the surface, but soft and gooey within, 8 to 10 minutes for small, 10 to 12 for large. Rotate the sheets from top to bottom and front to back halfway through baking time (so set a timer for 4 or 5 minutes, rotate, another 4 or 5 minutes). Slide the parchment paper onto racks to cool completely. If you have more batter to bake, wait for the sheets to cool before baking more cookies. Can be kept for 2 days at room temperature.

Last edited by Saria; 02-06-2010 at 12:10 PM.
Wow Saria, thanks for sharing all that!

I'm considering some of the linked recipes. Those raspberry truffles look really good. Great time of year for them too, but I'm noting them for future reference.

The Sour Cream Mocha Cake is intriguing and fairly simple but between that and Robert's Chocolate cookies, I have the kind of coffee on hand that the cookies call for. I may do something with this chocolate today (have guests over later) or another time... I'll let you know how whatever I make turns out.
“It was only a sunny smile and little it cost in the giving but like morning light it scattered the night and made the day worth living.” - F. Scott Fitzgerald
Could you make this:

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/d...ipe/index.html

Hot Fudge Pudding
Ingredients
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 2/3 cup sugar
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa, divided
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 2 tablespoons butter, melted
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 cup brown sugar, packed
  • 3/4 cup boiling water
  • 1/2 cup raspberries
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream, whipped
Directions

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.


Grease 2 medium ramekins or 4 by 4-inch baking dishes, and set aside. In a medium bowl, combine the flour, sugar, baking powder, salt, and 1/4 cup cocoa. Whisk in the milk, butter, and vanilla, just until smooth. Divide the batter between the 2 baking dishes.

In a small bowl, mix the brown sugar and remaining 1/4 cup cocoa, and sprinkle evenly over the batter. Carefully pour 3/4 cup boiling water over each dish and add about 8 raspberries to each dish.

Bake 30 minutes. Let cool for 10 minutes before serving. Top with a dollop of whip cream and a few fresh raspberries.
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I don't have a recipe for you, but a flourless chocolate cake is a wonderful thing.
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That pudding is made with cocoa, not unsweetened chocolate. She could in theory adapt it, but it takes some work to sub one for the other. Flourless cake is made with bittersweet chocolate.
Oh OK then could you make tiramisu, just add extra sugar?
http://www.bhg.com/recipe/chocolate/...late-tiramisu/

Or Pots de Creme:
http://www.gourmetsleuth.com/Recipes...Creme-828.aspx
No MAS.

I am the new Black.

"Hope the Mail are saving space tomorrow for Samantha Brick's reaction piece on the reactions to her piece about the reactions to her piece." ~ Tweet reposted by Rou.

http://www.youtube.com/user/Kimshi4242

http://www.tumblr.com/blog/kimshi4242
Tiramisu doesn't have chocolate, at least not a classic one, outside of a few shavings here and there. Nevermind, I clicked the recipe. In general I think it's better to stick to the chocolate specified. Adding too much sugar changes texture and other factors. Plus unsweetened chocolate can be too intense or harsh in certain recipes. I think a pot de creme might work okay, but it would be way too intense for me, at least.
Phoenix and Suburbanbushbabe, thanks for the suggestions

I probably should have updated this thread after resolving to make the Robert's Chocolate Cookies last week, even though I didn't get to them until last night.

Saria, I wound up copying and pasting the recipe to word, enlarging the font for easy reading (printer isn't working) and going back and forth between my pc in my room and the kitchen.

I didn't know from glancing over the recipe a week ago that you put personal input into it. It was great because what you put in parenthesis wound up being exactly what I was wanting to know or what turned out to be helpful to know. Made me think since you love food so much and sharing about it and anticipating what people need or want to know regarding it, you'd probably make a great instructor in the field if you ever care to try that out.

The cookies came out pretty good, and I mostly intend them for guests tonight. They're actually the most complex step and attention wise that I've made (experienced with really basic cookie recipes), which is cool as I'm trying to challenge myself baking wise.

They may have been even better if I followed the recipe closer. As it was I didn't have enough white sugar, so 1/4th of the sugar called for wound up being brown sugar.

Also didn't have unsalted butter so I used salted butter and about a third of the amount of salt called for.

Only had medium sized eggs and I chose to beat that portion of the ingredients by hand (though I do have a mixer) for a long time, and the batter did become thicker but the eggs never really fell off the whisk looking like ribbons...slightly, but still a bit runny for that.

Lastly, the 4 oz. of dry cacao chips that I used were the size shown on the package of the Ghirardelli's...about 3 times the size of a standard chip, so there are globs of totally unsweetened cacao amidst the rich and sweetened (but not too sweet) cookies. It's not necessarily bad, because there's still sweetness in every bite. I think it would be better if they were smaller chips/chunks though.

Overall I love them though and my parents thought they were pretty good as is (they've let me know when something isn't so good so I trust them). I love the taste of the batter even more, the mix of coffee, vanilla and chocolate Looking forward to baking up the rest tonight.

Thanks for all the help!
IkeEdwin likes this.
“It was only a sunny smile and little it cost in the giving but like morning light it scattered the night and made the day worth living.” - F. Scott Fitzgerald
1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa, divided
Originally Posted by Phoenix
That looks like a great recipe, but it appears to have cocoa instead of cacao.
1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa, divided
Originally Posted by Phoenix
That looks like a great recipe, but it appears to have cocoa instead of cacao.
Originally Posted by Eilonwy
Yeah, Saria noted that too.
No MAS.

I am the new Black.

"Hope the Mail are saving space tomorrow for Samantha Brick's reaction piece on the reactions to her piece about the reactions to her piece." ~ Tweet reposted by Rou.

http://www.youtube.com/user/Kimshi4242

http://www.tumblr.com/blog/kimshi4242
Oh, I'm glad you liked them, and it's cool that you tried something slightly our of your comfort level! With the beating, you really see a difference in color as all that air is introduced into the eggs. And it gets very thick and billowy.
The chips you want to chop. The Scharffen Bergen comes in one single black, so you just chop that as you would a bar of bittersweet chocolate for chocolate chip cookies. But still, it sound like they turned out well and I hope you'll continue to try out new things in baking.
Thanks for the compliment and maybe I'll take some photos of the difference in the eggs when they first start out vs. once they've been beaten.
IkeEdwin likes this.
Yeah, Saria noted that too.
Originally Posted by Phoenix
LOL... I thought I'd edited that out shortly after I posted it, but I guess I forgot to hit "Save"!
IkeEdwin likes this.
I'm not a fan of chocolate but everyone in my family is so here's what they usually do.
  • Make a plain cheesecakes but have chocolate crust instead.
  • chocolate waffles
  • chocolate pancakes
  • chocolate muffins
  • Using some of the chocolate in a meat sauce will a depth to the flavor.
  • chocolate and peanut butter cookies

~iherb.com Coupon Code: EMA790

http://neemsnthings.blogspot.com
Well I'm a chocolate fanatic so I'd probably say eat it like that (then again, Ghirardelli tastes so watered-down to me).

Off the top of my head: cakes, brownies, mix it with sweeter chocolate and make truffles, put a small amount into chili. Don't knock chocolate chili til you've tried it.

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