Being natural with Alopecia

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  • 1 Post By Blueblood
  • 1 Post By Blueblood
  • 1 Post By Blueblood

It's a struggle being natural and my hair being the length it is. I have a lot of alopecia spots. My biggest two are right in the front near my hairline. One of them you can fit four fingers into. I'm not ashamed to post about it bc its not something I can control. I was told bioten helps a lot with alopecia. Hair has grown in the spots but I'm starting to find more. Any advice is helpful.

Alise'
Also my hair is starting to shed really bad. I have a mix of 3a-4a

Alise'
Welcome! Might be best to discuss diet, supplements and the shedding with your family doctor or dermatologist.
2a-2c, medium texture, porous/ colour treated. Three years CG. Past bra strap length heading for waist.

CO-wash: Inecto coconut/ Elvive Volume Collagen
Treatments: Komaza Care Matani, coconut/ sweet almond/ fractionated coconut oils, Hairveda Sitrinillah
Leave in: Fructis Sleek & Shine (old), Gliss Ultimate Volume, various Elvive
Styler: Umberto Giannini jelly, Au Naturale styling gelee
Flour sack towel, pixie diffuse or air dry.
Experimenting with: benign neglect
Thanks. I'm going to get some bioten today. I also read plenty of water is good too. Any recommendations for moisture with 3c/4a hair? I tried the loc method but it made my hair look dry and filthy like I had too much product.

Alise'
Don't just take one supplement - go to the doctor and have come comprehensive blood tests done.

If you have an iron test make sure you have a ferritin level done not just Haemoglobin. Also have a Vitamin D test.

Make sure you get a copy of the actual results from the lab. The normal ranges of ferritin level and Vitamin D can be set too low to stop hair loss in some labs .This means your doctor can say your levels are fine when in fact they are too low.

My hair has shred a few times in my life. The first time I had iron deficiency anaemia and more recently I've got a Vitamin D deficiency.

When the iron deficiency was rectified my hair stop shredding and as my Vitamin D level has increased my hair has stopped shredding.

I forgot to say also make sure your Thyroid level is checked and you get the actual results.
Firefox7275 likes this.
Blueblood I actually went to the doctors and they drew blood. I was suppose to come back for my results but I never did. I'm going to call and reschedule. Also I do know for a fact I have anemia. I think in total I have about 6. Ranging from the size of a dime to the width of 3 knuckles

Alise'
When my hair fell out I went for bloodwork. Pretty sure they gave me results over the phone. Mine was normal.
When my hair fell out I went for bloodwork. Pretty sure they gave me results over the phone. Mine was normal.
Originally Posted by adthomas
What a GP will say is "normal" is not what a specialist in dermotology etc will say is an adequate level.

A ferritin level for premenopausal women down to 6 is "normal" for some labs and therefore GPs, but seriously deficient for dermatologists.

That's why you need to get the actual figures preferably as an email or in print.

Plus medical advice can change quickly. For example I'm currently vitamin D deficient and the recommendation of the level I have to reach to be "adequate" has changed within a year.

I've seen the range change for thyroid hormones as well.

Personally I would get the blood work done, get a copy of the results then go and see a specialist as if you still have problems they won't go away just by a GP saying you are "normal".
Firefox7275 likes this.
Isnt the expensive

Alise'
Originally Posted by CurlyNelly
You could spend a small fortune on commercial supplements and cosmetic products recommended by mostly unqualified people on forums that probably won't work for you, or you can invest in addressing the root cause. Without a firm and clear diagnosis you cannot begin to self medicate safely and effectively, there is not even one form of anaemia.

You can certainly overhaul your own diet and lifestyle and I would encourage you to do so, but randomly supplementing really can do more harm than good. Be aware that micronutrients work synergistically and in opposition so you need a balance for health, sometimes targeted supplements to address medical issues OR known holes in the diet (eg. vegans or coeliacs). Many medical complaints and some prescribed medications are linked to specific deficiencies. Dietetics and nutrition are highly complex fields, medical professionals spend years studying to become registered practitioners.

You may find it helpful to start tracking your diet - weighing solid foods and measuring liquids not guessing with cups. The take an honest look at how many servings you eat from each food group in a day or week - fruit and veg in the full rainbow of colours, oily fish, other healthy fats, plain dairy, mineral and fibre rich foods (beans, lentils, nuts, seeds). Protein is best eaten little and often through the day, not great lumps of muscle meat.

And also an honest look at how many processed foods/ added sugars/ added fats/ added salt you eat (including breakfast cereals and deli meats). If it doesn't look much like when it came off the plant or animal and have only one or two ingredients it's probably processed. Some foods/ nutrients interfere with absorption of minerals including iron, so balance and serving size is important.

The most common deficiencies in the west are probably bioavailable vitamin D, long chain omega-3s and magnesium; for anaemia you may need to consider haem iron, vitamin B12, folic acid and vitamin C. Some superfoods tick many boxes: oily fish is rich in omega-3s, D, B12, biotin and protein for example, and is something we evolved eating on a daily basis. If we eat a balanced varied diet containing the right amount of servings from each food group we take in enough of every nutrient for basic health but not enough to treat medical conditions.

Commercial supplements do not substitute for nutrients from wholefoods, they often don't contain the easily absorbable form that food contains and are intended to be supplements only. Your doctor may advise you take a pharmacy quality/ strength supplement of certain nutrients to get your levels back into the right range.
2a-2c, medium texture, porous/ colour treated. Three years CG. Past bra strap length heading for waist.

CO-wash: Inecto coconut/ Elvive Volume Collagen
Treatments: Komaza Care Matani, coconut/ sweet almond/ fractionated coconut oils, Hairveda Sitrinillah
Leave in: Fructis Sleek & Shine (old), Gliss Ultimate Volume, various Elvive
Styler: Umberto Giannini jelly, Au Naturale styling gelee
Flour sack towel, pixie diffuse or air dry.
Experimenting with: benign neglect
Just to add to Firefox's great post - hair and nails are not seen by the body as the most essential organs to provide nutrients to.

This means your hair and nails are two parts of the body which will show deficiencies first.

Some deficiencies are symptoms of more serious illnesses and getting them looked as soon as possible can save you years of pain and illness.
Firefox7275 likes this.
When my hair fell out I went for bloodwork. Pretty sure they gave me results over the phone. Mine was normal.
Originally Posted by adthomas
What a GP will say is "normal" is not what a specialist in dermotology etc will say is an adequate level.

A ferritin level for premenopausal women down to 6 is "normal" for some labs and therefore GPs, but seriously deficient for dermatologists.

That's why you need to get the actual figures preferably as an email or in print.

Plus medical advice can change quickly. For example I'm currently vitamin D deficient and the recommendation of the level I have to reach to be "adequate" has changed within a year.

I've seen the range change for thyroid hormones as well.

Personally I would get the blood work done, get a copy of the results then go and see a specialist as if you still have problems they won't go away just by a GP saying you are "normal".
Originally Posted by Blueblood
Thanks for the advice but I did see a dermatologist. I just had the bloodwork done at gp.
The truth is there are no guarantees. Whether you look to a forum or go to the doctor. I suggest you go to doc AND look at alternative. Don't do anything too crazy but keep an open mind. The thing about people with medical degrees is sometimes they can be quick to dismiss anything that doesnt involve writing a prescription. I went to the dermatologist almost once a month for a year. $45 copay a pop. He diagnosed what kind of alopecia I had by looking at my scalp. I had had bloodwork done before going to him so I did not think I had cancer or anything like that. He prescribed a $350 steroid foam. Thank God I have insurance so it was like $60. I bought it maybe three times before I quit because it did nothing. He also prescribed me pills. Nothing. Creams. Nada. Whenever I mentioned anything I read on line or what someone with my exact same diagnosis said worked for them he would blow it off. Finally I started looking into alternative medicine. And to be honest a lot of them didn't work (ie garlic, cayenne) but they cost nowhere near the prescription. I finally discovered success with blends of eo's. But certain ones. Example wild hair growth worked for my cousin who also went through abrupt hair loss but not for me.Doo Gro oil blend grew a lot of my hair in along with massage. Last time I went to derm he was so proud at how my hair was growing I didnt tell him how I quit using his stuff long ago. After that I didnt go back.
The truth is there are no guarantees. Whether you look to a forum or go to the doctor. I suggest you go to doc AND look at alternative. Don't do anything too crazy but keep an open mind. The thing about people with medical degrees is sometimes they can be quick to dismiss anything that doesnt involve writing a prescription. I went to the dermatologist almost once a month for a year. $45 copay a pop. He diagnosed what kind of alopecia I had by looking at my scalp. I had had bloodwork done before going to him so I did not think I had cancer or anything like that. He prescribed a $350 steroid foam. Thank God I have insurance so it was like $60. I bought it maybe three times before I quit because it did nothing. He also prescribed me pills. Nothing. Creams. Nada. Whenever I mentioned anything I read on line or what someone with my exact same diagnosis said worked for them he would blow it off. Finally I started looking into alternative medicine. And to be honest a lot of them didn't work (ie garlic, cayenne) but they cost nowhere near the prescription. I finally discovered success with blends of eo's. But certain ones. Example wild hair growth worked for my cousin who also went through abrupt hair loss but not for me.Doo Gro oil blend grew a lot of my hair in along with massage. Last time I went to derm he was so proud at how my hair was growing I didnt tell him how I quit using his stuff long ago. After that I didnt go back.
Originally Posted by adthomas
You should have told the derm straight it didn't work so he can't add you to his success figures.

BTW did you notice the OP, curlynelly, mentioned she was anaemic before you started posting about your own mysterious hair loss?

A lot of female hair loss is caused by nutritional deficiencies and/or hormones.

Nutritional deficiencies on their own are generally the easiest cause of hair loss to rectify hence why I always stress, like a few other posters, to get blood work done and get the actual figures.

Other causes such as hormonal, disease and unexplained loss are harder to impossible to rectify so logic would dictate find out if your hair loss falls into one of the easiest to rectify causes before investigating others.

Also if your hair loss is one of the symptoms of disease getting checked out will enable the disease to be diagnosed. I was actual diagnosed with something completely unrelated to hair loss in any way just because I got blood work done.

Finally I should add one of my sisters (I have 5) had unexplained hair loss in her early 20s. Finally after seeing lots doctors and healers, taking pills, and massaging lotions and potions into her head her hair started to grow back about a year after she quit seeing them. We still to this day don't know why it fell out and why it grew back.
The truth is there are no guarantees. Whether you look to a forum or go to the doctor. I suggest you go to doc AND look at alternative. Don't do anything too crazy but keep an open mind. The thing about people with medical degrees is sometimes they can be quick to dismiss anything that doesnt involve writing a prescription. I went to the dermatologist almost once a month for a year. $45 copay a pop. He diagnosed what kind of alopecia I had by looking at my scalp. I had had bloodwork done before going to him so I did not think I had cancer or anything like that. He prescribed a $350 steroid foam. Thank God I have insurance so it was like $60. I bought it maybe three times before I quit because it did nothing. He also prescribed me pills. Nothing. Creams. Nada. Whenever I mentioned anything I read on line or what someone with my exact same diagnosis said worked for them he would blow it off. Finally I started looking into alternative medicine. And to be honest a lot of them didn't work (ie garlic, cayenne) but they cost nowhere near the prescription. I finally discovered success with blends of eo's. But certain ones. Example wild hair growth worked for my cousin who also went through abrupt hair loss but not for me.Doo Gro oil blend grew a lot of my hair in along with massage. Last time I went to derm he was so proud at how my hair was growing I didnt tell him how I quit using his stuff long ago. After that I didnt go back.
Originally Posted by adthomas
You should have told the derm straight it didn't work so he can't add you to his success figures.

BTW did you notice the OP, curlynelly, mentioned she was anaemic before you started posting about your own mysterious hair loss?

A lot of female hair loss is caused by nutritional deficiencies and/or hormones.

Nutritional deficiencies on their own are generally the easiest cause of hair loss to rectify hence why I always stress, like a few other posters, to get blood work done and get the actual figures.

Other causes such as hormonal, disease and unexplained loss are harder to impossible to rectify so logic would dictate find out if your hair loss falls into one of the easiest to rectify causes before investigating others.

Also if your hair loss is one of the symptoms of disease getting checked out will enable the disease to be diagnosed. I was actual diagnosed with something completely unrelated to hair loss in any way just because I got blood work done.

Finally I should add one of my sisters (I have 5) had unexplained hair loss in her early 20s. Finally after seeing lots doctors and healers, taking pills, and massaging lotions and potions into her head her hair started to grow back about a year after she quit seeing them. We still to this day don't know why it fell out and why it grew back.
Originally Posted by Blueblood
Yes I did notice she mentioned anemia. Did you read where I said I got bloodwork and went to derm? I didnt tell her not to go to the doctor but to go to the doc and look at alternative treatments. Did you notice where she mentioned expense? Heaven forbid he prescribes a $365 foam and she has no insurance.

. I'm not sure where this mysterious comes from. I said in my post the derm gave a medical diagnosis for my type of hair loss. I did not look for alternative treatments without knowing what i had. That is how I was able to ask other people with my condition what worked for them. I had or have what is called Alopecia Areata . It is an auto immune condition. Now some auto immune conditions like Lupus or Chron's which my brother has have symptoms which include hair loss but AA is a kind of patchy hair loss which has no illness associated with it. The doctor told me I was not sick. My thyroid and hormones fine. I didnt assume it. The body in confusion attacks the hair follicles causing the hair to fall out. There is no cure but there are treatments to try to encourage regrowth. Some people have alopecia universalis lose the hair all over their body ie eyelashes, brows.. Some people do nothing and hair grows back on its own. It can be right away, it can be years, it can be never. I have a friend who hers fell out as a teen then it grew back after a year then 20 years later it suddenly fell out again. It is possible your sister has this but who knows. I'm glad hers grew in.

I don't see what the problem is with investigating alternatives especially if she might not be able to afford medications prescribed. The truth is there are some doctors who don't like to discuss natural remedies. I realize there are people pushing witches brew and snake oil but that is where discernment comes in. . We all need to be our own health advocates and stay informed about what we are taking, why, and the risks or side effects are.

To OP, also what helped me more than any treatment was talking about my feelings about my hair loss with someone who has been there. It is not just physical it is emotional. It can be a blow to your self esteem and sometimes people around you don't understand that. If you ever want to vent feel free to inbox me.
Also if you have insurance you might want to double check their policies about specialists. Mine won't allow me to go without a referral from gp. I had a hard time getting an appointment with derm. If someone had not canceled it would have taken months. The day before appt. i was talking to a coworker who told me about the rule and I had to call up and gripe for them to relent.
Hi Alise, alopecia is caused by many reasons and best way to treat is by changing our lifestyle and adding natural remedies to treat alopecia. I would like to recommend you one article Alopecia Treatment , which explains a lot about this grave situation, that helped my friend a lot and hope it will also help you too.

Last edited by AdamGray; 01-30-2014 at 04:33 AM.
There are a lot of things going on in this thread, but I am only commenting on alopecia. I have had reoccurring episodes for years. There are several forms and they have different causations. I have alopecia areata. This is not generalized hair loss or total hair loss. This form results in bare circles or patches of hair loss. There are several theories about what causes this, which range from stress to auto immune disorder, etc. which I'm not getting into here.

I usually go to a dermatologist. I get an injection of a steroid (actually several small ones) into the bare spot. Within about 10 days to 3 weeks, tiny hairs pop up and the spot completely fills in. Sometimes the hair will "switch back on" and start growing back in without an injection. However, the bald spot can go from a very small dot to a huge spot in a matter of days, so I usually don't risk that.

I've seen several dermatologists over the years and the treatment has not varied. There is a topical solution that can be used instead of an injection but the injection works the fastest. It apparently doesn't work for everyone or for all forms of alopecia. Whether I am under stress, taking vitamins, massaging oils into my hair, or doing any else that others here suggested seems to be irrelevant to whether I have an episode.

For me, going to a dermatologist is the only solution. The injection is not horribly expensive and one trip is all it takes. I'm not saying you should not try other things, but I recommend seeing a dermatologist as the first step for anyone else with this type of alopecia.
2b/2c ( weather permitting - 3a), fine texture but lots of it, colored and highlights, BSL.
Experimenting w CG since Oct 2012

Current rotation:
cowash= TN
AG Gel Mousse, LA Gel,
DT = Coconut oil (love)

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