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hair doens't grow past a certain length

HI there,

I've been natural for over 10 years now and I think I have a pretty good handle on my hair...until a certain point. I recently cut it off to about an inch again, which I do almost every 2 to 3 years because I reach a certain length and it just seems to stop growing. Also, the texture in the back and sides is different from that on the top of my head so the hair up top always looks longer (looser curl) than that on the back and end (tighter curl). So when it gets to about 6 inches in front, I think it starts to look bad and always end up cutting it off since it isn't getting past that length. Any advice on what could be causing the growth slow down and what to do about it? Much appreciated.

2 Answers

Connoisseur
Best answer chosen by asker

My hair always looks the same length for the longest time until *poof* one day it actually looks like it's grown several inches. Try giving it a little longer before you cut it off. If still no growth, it sounds like you have reached your terminal length. Terminal length is genetically determined, and you cannot force your hair to grow past it. As far as your different textures, getting a dry haircut (devacut) significantly helps with shaping multi-pattern hair to look even.

Editor

Hi Oshoveli!

Here is what I think might be the what's going on: I have read that our hair goes through different stages of growth and "rest" and shedding. Most of our hair is in the growing phase at any given time. This phase is said to last anywhere from 2-7 years and would determine the maximum length your hair grows. It sounds like your hair's growth phase might be 2-3 years.

Another option, though possibly less likely, is that you have always cut it before it has a chance to get past a certain length. That awkward stage you are referring to can seem a lot longer when you are just waiting for it to be over, and if your hair grows slower than the average approx. 1/2 in per month (it's an average not a fact for everyone) it may not seem like it's growing.

Either way, if you haven't already been doing so, you could stimulate hair growth with daily scalp massages for one week each month or just weekly massages (massage deeply, you should feel your scalp moving), eating a protein and nutrient rich diet to feed your hair (nuts, beans, dark leafy greens, fish, meat...fruits and veggies, brown rice, quinoa and whole grains...you know the drill) and drinking lots of water every day. You may find your hair thrives more under such ideal conditions.

These are all just my guesses, but I hope something in there was helpful!

sources: 

http://www.naturallycurly.com/curlreading/transiti...

http://www.viviscal.com/hair-growth-cycle

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