A scene from "Good Hair".

Chris Rock's much-anticipated documentary about the complex relationship between black women and their hair had a limited-release opening Friday, so while we wait for the nationwide release, we'll offer you a few snippets from CurlTalkers and national reviewers. We'll have a full review shortly after the movie opens nationwide on October 23.

CurlTalker KsLiZCuRlZ: CurlTalker Curlygoddess: The New York Times film critic Jeanette Catsoulis:

"In fact, one of the happy consequences of “Good Hair” should be a radical increase in white-woman empathy for their black sisters. Whether in thrall to “creamy crack,” a scary, aluminum-dissolving chemical otherwise known as relaxer (what it’s really relaxing, observes Mr. Rock astutely, is white people), or the staggeringly expensive and time-consuming weave (often available on layaway plan), the women in the film bare heads and hearts with humor and without complaint.

Los Angeles Times film critic Betsy Sharkey:

"The documentary uses comparison rather than condemnation to make its key points. ....Rock interviews a scientist analyzing the ingredients found in typical straightening products. The demonstration shows they can eat through a soda can in a few hours. That's followed by conversations with girls as young as 5 having their hair straightened. No, they don't like the process, but they love the result. We can connect the dots."

The Associated Press film critic Jesse Washington:

"Rock is the perfect "Good Hair" host. His ad-libbed quips and silly-serious questions put interview subjects and viewers at ease with this sometimes painful reality, keeping them laughing instead of crying. And when Rock ventures into a hair store trying to sell some kinky "black hair" to the Asian owner, his comedy cuts to the root of the issue in a way Ken Burns never could. 'Everyone want straight hair,' the owner says. 'It look more natural.' "