photos courtesy of Transitions Hair Solutions

Experiencing hair loss as a result of chemotherapy medication can an experience be nothing short of traumatic. While maintaining appearance is certainly not the number one priority during this painful time in a chemotherapy sufferer's life, it definitely helps lift the spirit and divert their attention from the otherwise horrible side effects they face in their everyday.

Danielle Grillo of Transitions Hair Solutions in New Jersey is offering a helping hand in making hair loss victims a bit happier.

She offers a newly created 3-dimensional hairpiece.  Although her product is considered expensive to most and not readily available to the general public, there's no doubt that its creation is a positive step in the right direction in the world of medical science. 

It's a prosthetic, not a wig

Whatever you do, don't call the 3d hairpiece a wig. According to Grillo, this truly one-of-a-kind object is actually more of a prosthetic. She describes it to Today as "a scalp and hair prosthetic because it can be used for any kind of hair loss--related to chemotherapy, a scalp burn, autoimmune disorder."

The 3d printing is fully customizable. Some things that can be changed in order to more accurately represent one's head are the size and color of their scalp, hair texture, length, color, and even density.

The 3d printing is fully customizable. Some things that can be changed in order to more accurately represent one's head are the size and color of their scalp, hair texture, length, color, and even density.

These pieces can cover an entire head or just a piece, depending on what he or she needs specifically. It is versatile enough to have the ability to be worn by someone even in the shower, though Grillo recommends the piece getting thoroughly cleaned every four to six weeks to prolong its quality and appearance.

How the 3d hairpiece is made

Grillo first collects a detailed list of measurements, then sends them off to Cesare Ragazzi Laboratories based in Italy. From there, a lifelike 3-dimensional printing is created, strand by strand, with real human hair. Even the adhesive used to bond the hair to the piece is first tested and approved by a certified dermatologist.

How much does it cost?

Expect to pay an upward of $15,000 for this customized hair prosthetic. In Grillo's own words, "It's not for everyone, not everyone can afford it. There are no options that are still good. This is just a step above, and something different." So while her 3d printed hairpiece is considered innovative, Grillo makes it no secret that she intends to make her invention accessible only to patients with a larger amount of personal financial resources. 

If you or someone you know is interested in more information on customizable 3d printed hairpieces, visit the Transitions Hair Solutions website.