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Thinning hairline on a woman

Female hair loss occurs in more than one pattern. If you are a woman with loss of scalp hair, you should seek professional advice from a physician hair-restoration specialist.

In most cases, female hair loss can be effectively treated. If you are a woman who has started to lose scalp hair, you are not alone if:

  • You are unpleasantly surprised by the hair loss
  • You don’t understand why you are losing hair

The patterns of hair loss in women are not as easily recognizable as those in men.

Unlike hair loss in men, female hair loss may commonly begin at any age through 50 or later, may not have any obvious hereditary association, and may not occur in a recognizable "female-pattern alopecia" of diffuse thinning over the top of the scalp. A woman who notices the beginning of hair loss may not be sure if the loss is going to be temporary or permanent—for example, if there has been a recent event such as pregnancy or illness that may be associated with temporary hair thinning.

If you are a woman who is worried about loss of scalp hair, you should consult a physician hair restoration specialist for an evaluation and diagnosis.

Self-diagnosis is often ineffective. Women tend to have less obvious patterns of hair loss than men, and non-pattern types of hair loss are more frequent in women than in men. Diagnosis of hair loss in a woman should be made by a trained and experienced physician.

Androgenetic Alopecia

In women as in men, the most likely cause of scalp hair loss is androgenetic alopecia — an inherited sensitivity to the effects of androgens (male hormones) on scalp hair follicles. However, women with hair loss due to this cause usually do not develop true baldness in the patterns that occur in men — for example, women rarely develop the "cue-ball" appearance often seen in male-pattern androgenetic alopecia.

Patterns of female androgenetic alopecia can vary considerably in appearance. Patterns that may occur include:

  • Diffuse thinning of hair over the entire scalp, often with more noticeable thinning toward the back of the scalp.
  • Diffuse thinning over the entire scalp, with more noticeable thinning toward the front of the scalp but not involving the frontal hairline.
  • Diffuse thinning over the entire scalp, with more noticeable thinning toward the front of the scalp, involving and sometimes breaching the frontal hairline.

Unlike the case for men, thinning scalp hair in women due to androgenetic alopecia does not uniformly grow smaller in diameter (miniaturize). Women with hair loss due to androgenetic alopecia tend to have miniaturizing hairs of variable diameter over all affected areas of the scalp. While miniaturizing hairs are a feature of androgenetic alopecia, miniaturization may also be associated with other causes and is not in itself a diagnostic feature of androgenetic alopecia. In post-menopausal women, for example, hair may begin to miniaturize and become difficult to style. The precise diagnosis should be made by a physician hair restoration specialist.

It is important to note that female pattern hair loss can begin as early as the late teens to early 20s in women who have experienced early puberty. If left untreated, this hair loss associated with early puberty can progress to more advanced hair loss if it is left untreated.

Non-Pattern Causes of Female Hair Loss

In women more often than in men, hair loss may be due to conditions other than androgenetic alopecia. Some of the most common of these causes are:

Trichotillomania compulsive hair pulling. Hair loss due to trichotillomania is typically patchy, as compulsive hair pullers tend to concentrate the pulling in selected areas. Hair loss due to this cause cannot be treated effectively until the psychological or emotional reasons for trichotillomania are effectively addressed.

Alopecia areata a possibly autoimmune disorder that causes patchy hair loss that can range from diffuse thinning to extensive areas of baldness with "islands" of retained hair. Medical examination is necessary to establish a diagnosis.

Triangular alopecia loss of hair in the temporal areas that sometimes begins in childhood. Hair loss may be complete, or a few fine, thin-diameter hairs may remain. The cause of triangular alopecia is not known, but the condition can be treated medically or surgically.

Scarring alopecia hair loss due to scarring of the scalp area. Scarring alopecia typically involves the top of the scalp and occurs predominantly in women. The condition frequently occurs in African-American women and is believed to be associated with persistent tight braiding or "corn-rowing" of scalp hair. A form of scarring alopecia also may occur in post-menopausal women, associated with inflammation of hair follicles and subsequent scarring.

Telogen effluvium a common type of hair loss caused when a large percentage of scalp hairs are shifted into "shedding" phase. The causes of telogen effluvium may be hormonal, nutritional, drug-associated, or stress-associated. Loose-anagen syndrome—a condition occurring primarily in fair-haired persons in which scalp hair sits loosely in hair follicles and is easily extracted by combing or pulling. The condition may appear in childhood, and may improve as the person ages.

Diagnosis and Treatment

If you are a woman with thinning or lost scalp hair, your first necessary step is to have the condition correctly diagnosed by a physician hair restoration specialist. After a diagnosis is made, the physician will recommend an approach to effective medical or surgical treatment.


Reprinted with permission from the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery.For more information, please visit www.ISHRS.org

0 Comments
Hey, great article on female baldness. I would like to share my experience of curing hair fall by using Parachute Advansed Therapie Hair Vitalizer. This oil based hair solution helped in controlling my hair fall. I massage it on my scalp and leave it overnight. The next day I wash it off with a herbal shampoo. Also. I have brought about changes in my diet to include more fruits and green leafy veggies. I have also started to exercise and doing yoga. Additionally, I sleep well and don't take unecessary stress.
Ill pass this on, thank you
Good read, I haven't heard of Androgenetic Alopecia, but I will definitely read up some more on it.
Thyroid disease is a major cause of hair loss and/or thinning.
I like some more information about Teleogen Effluvium and especially loose-anagen syndrome since I seem to have some of the features of these along with Androgenic Alopeica from PCOS. thanks
Sigh, this is what is happening to me. It is no good.
Scary!

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