They say when a woman cuts her hair, she’s about to change the world. For Lea Robinson, cutting and coloring her hair led to a liberation of her emotions, physical appearance and the welcoming of new opportunities. The singer and TV personality isn’t foreign to the entertainment industry’s love for revolving hair styles. This change was more personal though. After trading in her long locks for a chic pixie cut and going from black hair to blonde bombshell, Lea was ready do what was needed to maintain her new style. 

There are so many reasons women explore the idea of a big chop. Beyond wanting to be natural, some of us go through life changes that require us to let go of the past and embrace something new. During a period of self-discovery, Lea picked up the scissors and never looked back. “I cut my hair maybe about a year and a half ago. Just like a lot of women who go through a break up, that was me. I felt really powerful,” she said. “With cutting off my hair, I let go of the past. It made me feel like a woman and I got to highlight my true features. There were no wigs or weaves hiding me. It made me embrace my true self.”

If you’ve never done a big chop before you’ll learn there is a period of time where you have to adjust to your new look. Some may opt to wear a wig or weave because they’re not fully comfortable with their style while others feel a sense of freedom because the weight of their hair is gone and they’re able to fully embrace their face. Lea was in love with her hair but after almost 2 years of maintaining a short cut, she wanted to explore more style options. “I needed something new. I loved my short hair and I didn’t want to go back to wearing wigs and weaves. I went to my stylist, Justin Bell Risper, and he said ‘Lea you have to do this is steps, you can’t go straight to blonde,’” she recalled. “Once we did it, I felt alive again. I felt the same way I did when I first cut my hair. It was a new version of myself.”

Lea’s stylist was right. Going from black to blonde can take a toll on your hair. Fortunately for her, she maintained a good hair regimen prior to adding color. “I thought my hair texture was going to change. Before going blonde I began treating my hair, which was new for me because I never used treat my hair at all. I would go to bed without a scarf and all. Because I treated my hair, it actually remained the same.”

So what was her secret? Lea has mastered the art of keeping her hair moisturized. “I naturally have dry skin and dry hair. I used a lot of coconut oil right before I color it. My hair absorbs everything so I have to use products that will keep it well moisturized. Miss Jessie's Quick Curls and Pillow Soft Curls is good for my curl pattern and it doesn’t leave any flakes or residue in my hair. I used to use Nairobi Edge Control to slick it down, but switched up when I went blonde because it left a color tint. I love Gots To Be Edge Control for my edges.”

Lea’s hair regimen is quite simple. After applying coconut oil and applying either Quick Curls or Pillow Soft Curls (because different moods call for different products), she puts on the one item that her hair can’t live without; a durag. “The durag is life changing. I used to wear scarves all the time and im such a wild sleeper. The durags do everything. It literally changed my life. Sometimes I get headaches from tying them too tight but it’s well worth it!”

It’s been roughly 3 months since Lea has gone blonde and she loves it. To keep her look fresh, her wardrobe stylist Mickey Freeman pulls looks that highlights her face and compliments her new style. This cut couldn’t have come at a better time. “I couldn’t be more excited for what God has planned for me for my future. I have two musical projects that I’m working on right now. My self help book is getting its final touches and I’m also going to be returning to the TV screen very soon. All in all I’m just blessed and excited for what’s to come.”

Do you have blonde hair, a pixie cut, or both? Share your tips for maintaining your style with us in the comments below!

Photo credits: Lea Robinson