I remember when I first began my transitioning process towards the end of 2011 like it was yesterday.

Because I wasn’t fully ready to break out of my relaxed, bone-straight hair lifestyle, I resorted to trying a sew-in weave for the first time. A few months later I finally mustered up the courage to head to the salon for a professional chop. The weave was out, and the relaxed hairs were scattered across the salon floor. This was my first official step toward accepting my completely natural hair. I was excited for this upcoming stage in my life, although I’ll admit how nervous I was. My hair was super short, it was now curly (I hadn’t worn it naturally curly since I was five!), and I was clueless as to how to care for it in its natural state.

While beginning work at NaturallyCurly in 2012 certainly helped my journey...

I still found myself wandering aimlessly in beauty supply stores seeking things that would help with what I first considered my hair’s “downfalls”:

  • I have medium to high porosity.
  • At the time I was TWA length.
  • My curls are naturally finer and springier in the front.
  • In the back they are wiry and thicker.

These were all obstacles I saw myself having to overcome in the process of figuring out the exact definition of Devri’s Hair. Yes, I just referred to my hair in the third person.

Throughout the years it has taken me tons of experimenting, a few bad trims, becoming a committed product junky, and watching endless YouTube curly hair tutorials for me to finally come to terms with the fact that my hair type, texture, length, and thickness is what it is. Sure, the denial process lasted longer than it probably should have. But I look at it this way--it could have taken me longer to accept. But for my own personal hair and beauty journey, I am beyond thankful for each moment of confusion, bad hair days, and the fact that not every product, style, or routine does the same for my hair as it will for the next person’s.

Once I figured out what works for me as far as technique, routine, products, and ingredients, I stuck to a few staples and must-haves. I still consider myself a pretty open-minded individual when it comes to my hair and style, but if I know silicones leave my hair a sticky hot mess, I’m going to for sure stay away from them every chance I get.

[quote cite="I am beyond thankful for each moment of confusion, bad hair days, and the fact that not every product, style, or hair routine does the same for my curls as it will for the next person’s."][/quote]

Constantly comparing myself to the beautiful women I saw on hair product advertisements, TV commercials, and even movies and thinking to myself, “She has the same hair type I do, but my hair doesn’t look like hers (does that make sense?)” I realized that my hair is truly MY HAIR. Nobody else’s. I have no clue what that girl uses, or what she did to achieve that look. Everyone has different needs for their own hair and it’s going to take a while to find what those needs are. A lot of trial and error, plenty of patience. Having a great support system always helps, too.

Returning to your natural roots may not be the overnight success you were hoping for, but trust me, girl--it will be well worth it! Do what works for you and be happy in it. Embrace all of your own personal beauty quirks and flaws (if you want to call them that), and stop comparing your selfie side by side to another whose hair will never resemble yours.

How long has it taken you to accept your hair's true, natural texture?

Let me know what motivated you to stay in the journey, or if you realized it wasn't for you. And keep up with my personal hair and health journey here.