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My-Cherie

My-Cherie

This month, we are pleased to welcome My-Cherie to NaturallyCurly. She is a 4b who loves her natural texture, and likes to help others who are transitioning. Her column will focus on hair and other beauty topics.

About me: My name is My-Cherie, and I am a native of Cheraw, South Carolina, hometown of legendary trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie. I moved to Austin, Texas, from Las Vegas, Nevada, after working as Cleopatra “Queen of Eygpt” at Caesars Palace for three years. I also worked in the modeling industry in Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Atlanta and Greece. I currently work as a model, actress and inspirationalist. I enjoy being involved in many charities. “Give and you will always receive” is pretty much how I look at life. My hair is a 4b, and I wear it in a combed out afro or I twist it and make curly cues. My hair is an extension of who I am and who I am always striving to be: natural, truthful, strong and free.

An unidentified Glamour magazine editor tells a New York law firm that African American women need to stop rocking the afros and dreads and start hot combing their naps to be accepted in corporate America. All I have to say is, “TACKY, TACKY, TACKY.”The way you choose to wear your hair has nothing to do with your ability to perform your job. You are supposed to be hired and promoted based on your talent and qualifications. Don’t tell me how to wear my hair! I was a little taken away by the comments made about afros and dreads; but then I began to wonder, is it really necessary to get upset.I am an African American woman and I have been wearing my hair naturally fro’d out in public for 4 years. I am not ashamed. I love my afro and my man does too. Some people are going to love it, and some people just don’t get it. I have worked in the modeling and acting industry for many years. I have been accepted and not accepted. Hair is a sensitive subject for black women. We want to look good and we want to be accepted. My hair is strong, coarse and my skin is thick.

Editor-in-Chief of Glamour magazine, Cindi Leive, apologized for the stupidity of this unidentified editor by saying, “Glamour is proud of its diverse readership and celebrates the beauty of all women”. Yes, clean it up; but don’t sweep it under the rug. It is unacceptable.

Ladies and gentlemen, don’t be afraid to wear your hair naturally, curly, kinky, dreaded, or fro’d out. You are unique and special. Fashion is the ability to create your own style based on your personality. No one should dictate that for you, not even Glamour magazine. My afro has flavor and style. I am socially and professionally acceptable. If you don’t like who I am and what I represent, then it’s your loss, not mine. It is very important to look in the mirror everyday and say, these three words “I am beautiful.”

Check out the articles here and here

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