pregnant hair dye

To dye or not to dye while pregnant? That is the question!

Being pregnant is a unique experience for every woman. It’s a time of change--emotional and physical highs and lows. With all the changes you go through, you may feel a burning desire to exert some control. If you’ve become used to dying your hair regularly, you may want to continue with this part of your beauty regimen. If you’d never dyed your hair before, you may think of it as a way to boosts your spirit, a way to have a bit more power over your appearance as your body continues to change.

Will dyeing your hair pose a risk to your unborn child?

Thought it is limited, there is scientific data regarding the safety of dyeing your hair while pregnant. There is at least one Baby Centre UK
that suggests that using hair dyes during pregnancy may result in neuroblastoma, a rare childhood cancer, however the bulk of the existing  does not support that finding. American Pregnancy have conducted animal testing that suggests there is no risk to your developing child if you choose to dye your hair. The general consensus is that the concentrations of potentially harmful chemicals found in hair dyes are too low to pose any harm to you or the developing fetus especially where skin (scalp) contact is avoided. For this reason, processes such as streaking, highlighting and frosting are more widely encouraged than full color coverage, according to Baby Center .
The general consensus is that the concentrations of potentially harmful chemicals found in hair dyes are too low to pose any harm

Your hormones may affect the chemicals' ability to work

Years ago when I was pregnant with my daughter, I was still relaxing my hair--I went natural after her birth. I remember going to the salon twice during my pregnancy and both times, I left with hair that had refused to take the relaxer. I learned that my pregnancy hormones had affected my hair to the point that it no longer responded to those chemicals. Even my first postpartum attempt at relaxing my hair did not work. The fact is that pregnancy alters the hair. It can change its density and texture as well as how the hair responds to chemicals. It is impossible to say how and if your hair will be affected but it is worth considering when trying to decide if you want to take the step and color your hair.

The fact is that pregnancy alters the hair. It can change its density and texture as well as how the hair responds to chemicals.

Take the following precautions when dyeing your hair

If you have chosen to dye your hair while pregnant, incorporate these tips into your coloring routine (many of them apply beyond pregnancy).

  • Delay dyeing for as long as you can. Second trimester is good. Third trimester is even better.
  • Use exactly as directed.
  • Do a patch test to make sure you’re not allergic
  • Ensure the area you dye your hair in is properly ventilated
  • Protect hands by wearing gloves
  • Ensure you rinse all traces of chemical from your hair

Is there a safer alternative to chemical hair dye?

Vegetable dyes with a henna base are considered safer alternatives for changing your hair color. Ammonia is one harmful ingredient that you want to avoid at all costs, so pay close attention to the contents of any hair color you use to ensure you know exactly what you are getting.

As always, consult your primary doctor and do research before making a change. Should you decide to go ahead and change up your hair color, visit a licensed hairstylist and colorist to discuss the potential options.