As a multi-textural hairstylist, the number one question I get is, “What do I use to make my hair grow?” My first response is the question, What does your diet look like?

A lot of people, in my experience, are not conscious of their daily meals. Some of us--admittedly, including myself--consume food that we know will have a negative impact on our hair, skin, and body. Yes, a million times over, your personal care products are super important--but what you eat and drink can be larger piece of the hair growth puzzle.

Derona King, Personal Wellness Designer with Zilphy’s Garden, promotes health and wellness and educates people on the benefits of plant-based nutrition. She has an undergraduate degree in Political Science, graduate studies in Biblical Counseling, certification from the Institute on Nutritional Leadership, thirty-five years of marriage and family, and fifty plus years of life experience to the nutritional wellness community.

Below, Derona gives me insight on how food impacts our hair, and so much more.

There is no doubt eating fresh fruit and vegetables are an essential aspect to keeping healthy hair. Unfortunately, many of our food sources are loaded with chemicals and pesticides which can wreak havoc on our endocrine system. A disrupted endocrine system obstructs hair growth.
Derona King, Personal Wellness Designer

Why I chose this natural wellness journey for my family

Our family’s journey toward nutritional wellness has been a series of trial and error, sometimes much more error than trial.

All three of our children were diagnosed with skin allergies. My eldest, who is also now my business partner, developed serious atopic dermatitis before her first birthday, my second developed psoriasis, and my youngest developed eczema. My husband and I turned to our medical doctors and dermatologist for their treatment.

For the decade or so that we sought their help, not one of our traditional doctors mentioned our children’s skin conditions were a result of damaging immune responses associated with what they were eating. Just as we were finding answers to healing our children’s skin conditions with the right foods, I began experiencing symptoms of menopause. It did not take long to discover that a whole-foods, plant-based nutrition approach was what I needed to make it through that period of life.

While it is true that topical hair care products can tame frizzies, accentuate curl patterns, straighten, shine, add volume and bounce, even stimulate hair growth, hair health starts on the inside. Nutrient deficiency can result in thinning, shedding, dry, brittle hair, and can even promote premature greying of the hair.

The foods that are good for everyone's hair

There is no doubt eating fresh fruit and vegetables are an essential aspect to keeping healthy hair. Unfortunately, many of our food sources are loaded with chemicals and pesticides which can wreak havoc on our endocrine system. A disrupted endocrine system obstructs hair growth.

In addition to organic dark leafy-green vegetables for iron and calcium, and fruits high in vitamin C, Zilphy’s Garden recommends other organic whole foods, that include protein, omega 3 fatty acids, and zinc for hair health.

For protein look for grass-fed meats, as well as collagen and amino acid rich bone-broth. For omega 3 fatty acids, eat wild caught fatty fish like salmon or tuna, and be sure to include omega 3 rich organic cold pressed coconut oil in your diet (and of course, coconut oil is great on your hair, as well). Zinc is vital for healthy hair. Our go-to food for zinc is pumpkin seeds.

As a promoter of plant-based nutrition our all time favorite food for healthy hair growth is pea-sprouts. Pea sprouts are an amazing source of phytonutrients and have been scientifically proven to stimulate hair growth. Many products that promote hair growth now boast pea sprout extract as an ingredient.

But, I prefer to eat my sprouts. You can juice sprouts, add them to a smoothie or a stir fry, even substitute them for lettuce on a sandwich. My personal way to enjoy the slightly nutty, crunchy pea sprout is to toss them in a salad. You can add some grilled salmon to make this a "hair-raising”  good meal.

ZG Healing Salad Recipe

  • 10 to 12-oz. Organic Baby Spinach Greens or Organic Raw Kale (washed tried and stems removed)
  • a generous handful Organic Pea Sprouts
  • ¼ of a small red onion
  • 1-2 tbs. raw pumpkin seeds
  • 1 sliced fresh Georgia peach

Healing Salad Dressing

  • 1 large clove of fresh garlic, minced
  • juice from a whole lemon
  • ½ teaspoon of lemon zest
  • 1 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar
  • 4 tablespoons of EVOO
  • 1-2 tsps of raw honey
  • ¼ tsp Himalayan sea salt
  • freshly ground black pepper to taste
Blend all ingredients together in a glass jar and drizzle over salad.

Read this article to learn more about Zilphy’s Garden "hair healing salad” recipe, and follow my exploits to use plant-based nutrition to heal my own hair. Don’t forget to toss in the pea sprouts!

To sum it up

Making wise nutritional choices can lead to show stopping curls, but most importantly  well balanced meals can lead to a healthier, happier you.

Visit Derona King at Zilphy and like her on Facebook to learn more ways to use plant-based nutrition to restore your nutritional heritage and heal your body.

 

Be honest: do you have a healthy diet for your hair?

Share your favorite recipe with us on Facebook.

Stacy is the owner of Augusta, GA-based curly hair salon, DyeVerCity. Follow her on Instagram @DyeVerCity.

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